Memorial Day

Lovin’ Lucy

The many faces of Lucy. Three years old and a teen in row two. Then there’s the goofy Lucy we love and the pretty Lucy starting out in the entertainment business. Matel even made a tribute Barbie-Lucy! Man, she certainly was a special force to be reckoned with. Who doesn’t love Lucy?  :)))))

Growing up, I got to see a bunch of the “older” TV shows you are now enjoying on cable or streaming – the ones that my parents would mention referencing  the early days of television – shows like Perry Mason, Gunsmoke, The Honeymooners, The Andy Griffith Show, Leave It To Beaver…and of course I Love Lucy. Watching the reruns, and laughing at Lucille Ball’s incredible timing, slapstick comedy and funny faces, I must agree she was quite the talent.  Friends of mine made a daytrip to the Lucille Dezi Museum in Jamestown NY (her birthplace) and said they had a blast, reliving her skits and memories of her acting career. I decided to do some digging to find out more about her early career and show life, and also share some trivia (cause we all like trivia) about Lucy, Ricky and the gang. Before you start reading, click HERE to get yourself in the “Lucy” mood, and find the interesting trivia about this screen below.  Special thanks to Wikipedia, YouTube and for the info.  Enjoy!!

Classic Lucy and Ethel

Lucille Désirée Ball (1911-1989) was an American actress and comedian, nominated for 13 Primetime Emmy Awards, winning five times, and was the recipient of several other accolades, such as the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award and two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She earned many honors, including the Women in Film Crystal Award, an induction into the Television Hall of Fame, a Kennedy Center Honor, and the Governor’s Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

She was born in Jamestown, NY, the first child and only daughter of Henry Durrell “Had” Ball, a lineman for Bell Telephone, and Désirée Evelyn “DeDe” (née Hunt) Ball.

Her father’s career with Bell Telephone frequently required the family to move during Lucy’s early childhood. Lucy’s father died of typhoid fever at age 27 when Lucy was only three. At that time, her mom DeDe was pregnant with her second child, Fred Ball (1915–2007).

Ball’s mother returned to NY, where her maternal grandparents helped raise Lucy and brother Fred in Celoron, a summer resort village on Chautauqua Lake. Their home was at 59 West 8th Street (later renamed to 59 Lucy Lane).

Ball loved Celoron Park. Its boardwalk had a ramp to the lake that served as a children’s slide, the Pier Ballroom, a roller-coaster, a bandstand, and a stage where vaudeville concerts and plays were presented. Four years after her Dad’s death, DeDe married Edward Peterson.

When Lucy was 12, her stepfather encouraged her to audition for his Shriners organization that needed entertainers for the chorus line of its next show. While Ball was onstage, she realized performing was a great way to gain praise.

In 1925, Ball, then only 14, started dating Johnny DeVita, a 21-year-old local hoodlum. Her mother was unhappy with the relationship. After about a year, her mother tried to separate them by exploiting Ball’s desire to be in show business. Despite the family’s meager finances, in 1926, she enrolled Lucy in the John Murray Anderson School for the Dramatic Arts in New York City. Ball later said about that time in her life, “All I learned in drama school was how to be frightened.” Her instructors felt she would not be successful in the entertainment business and were unafraid to directly state this to her.

In the face of this harsh criticism, Ball was determined to prove her teachers wrong and returned to New York City in 1928. That same year, she began working for Hattie Carnegie as an in-house model. Her acting forays were stalled at an early age when she became ill with rheumatic fever and was unable to work for two years.

In 1932, she moved back to New York City to resume her pursuit of an acting career, where she supported herself by again working for Carnegie and as the Chesterfield cigarette girl. Using the name Diane Belmont, she started getting chorus work on Broadway,

During the 30’s, Lucy moved to Hollywood, and played small movie roles with The Three Stooges, The Marx Brothers, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Katherine Hepburn. In 1940, she appeared as the lead in the musical Too Many Girls where she met and fell in love with Dezi Arnaz, who played on of her character’s bodyguards.

After many movies and radio jobs, Ball was cast in 1948 as Liz Cooper, a wacky wife in My Favorite Husband, a radio comedy for CBS Radio.  The show was successful and CBS asked her to develop it for television. She agreed, but insisted on working with her real-life husband, Cuban bandleader Desi Arnaz.

CBS executives were reluctant, thinking the public would not accept an Anglo-American redhead (her new hair color) and a Cuban as a couple. At first CBS was initially unimpressed with the pilot episode, produced by the couple’s Desilu Productions company.

I Love Lucy ran on CBS from October 15, 1951 to May 6, 1957 and was a smash hit. Not only a star vehicle for Lucille Ball, but also a potential means for her to salvage her marriage to Arnaz, as their relationship had become badly strained, in part because of hectic performing schedules, which often kept them apart, (but mostly due to Desi’s attraction to other women). I Love Lucy dominated U.S. ratings for most of its run.

For the production of I Love Lucy, Ball and Arnaz wanted to remain in their Los Angeles home, but prime time in Los Angeles was too late to air a major network series live on the East Coast. Sponsor Philip Morris pressured the couple into relocating, not wanting day-old kinescopes airing in major East Coast markets. Instead, the couple offered to take a pay cut to finance filming on better-quality 35 mm film, on the condition that Desilu would retain the rights of each episode once it aired.

CBS agreed to relinquish the post-first-broadcast rights to Desilu, not realizing they were giving up a valuable and enduring asset. In 1957, CBS bought back the rights for $1,000,000 ($10.4 million in today’s terms), financing Ball and Arnaz’s down payment for the purchase of the former RKO Pictures studios, which they turned into Desilu Studios.

A scene in which Lucy and Ricky practice the tango, in the episode “Lucy Does The Tango”, (evoked the longest recorded studio audience laugh in the history of the show), so long that the sound editor had to cut that section of the soundtrack in half. Watch

In the grape stomping episode, Lucy later said “I got into the vat with another actress, and she had been told that we would have a fight,” Lucy said on The Dick Cavett Show. “I slipped and, in slipping, I hit her accidentally and she took offense, until she hauled off and let me have it. Now this was supposed to happen — that she got right. But when she hit me, it took the wind out. She had been told that we were to stay down for a while, give me a chance to get my legs way up, so that they’d show in the camera, then up would come an arm and then both of them– my head was supposed to—but, well, my head never popped up. She’d get me down by the throat! I had grapes up my nose, in my ears, and she was choking me, and I’m really beating her to get her off…she didn’t understand that she had to let me up once in a while. I was drowning in these grapes!”

Along the way, Ball created a television dynasty and achieved several firsts. She was the first woman to head a TV production company, Desilu, which she had formed with Arnaz.

On July 17, 1951, less than three weeks prior to her 40th birthday, Ball gave birth to daughter Lucie Désirée Arnaz and a year and a half later, she gave birth to Desiderio Alberto Arnaz IV, known as Desi Arnaz, Jr. Before he was born, I Love Lucy was a solid ratings hit, and Ball and Arnaz wrote the pregnancy into the show. Ball’s necessary and planned caesarean section in real life was scheduled for the same date that her television character gave birth.

CBS insisted that a pregnant woman could not be shown on television, nor could the word “pregnant” be spoken on-air. After approval from several religious figures, the network allowed the pregnancy storyline, but insisted that the word “expecting” be used instead of “pregnant”. (Arnaz garnered laughs when he deliberately mispronounced it as “spectin'”.)

The episode aired on the evening of January 19, 1953, with 44 million viewers watching Lucy Ricardo welcome little Ricky, while in real life Ball delivered her second child, Desi Jr., that same day in Los Angeles. The birth made the cover of the first issue of TV Guide for the week of April 3–9, 1953.

And …. One of the most famous episodes of “I Love Lucy” features Lucy Ricardo promoting a health tonic called “Vitameatavegamin” in a television commercial. The scene is remembered for Lucy’s hilarious struggle with the product’s high alcohol content: VIEW HERE

Lucille Ball became the first woman to run a major TV studio. In 1962, Desi Arnaz resigned as the studio’s president, and Lucy bought out his holding in the company.

Four years later, CBS turned down the original “Star Trek” series pilot, fearing the weekly budget to produce it would be too high. But Lucy stood behind it and gave the crew the finances needed, and it was made. So, Trekkies, you’ve got Lucille Ball to thank for your obsession. (Desilu also went on to produce the TV series “Mission: Impossible.” Killer theme song. CLICK HERE

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Your Eyes

When you look into your mother’s eyes,
you know she is the purest love you can find on this earth. 

Happy Mother’s Day!

Your friends at KHT!

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“And They‘re Off”

Hats. Hats. Hats. Hats. Hats. Hats. RACE!!!!!  Hats. Hats. Hats. Hats. Hats. 

Like most things “spring” – turning of the season, start of baseball, basketball and hockey play-off games galore, spring flower bed clean-up and a trip or two or three to the garden center, cleaning out the garage, and more, one of my favorite traditions is the running of the Kentucky Derby. Often referred to as “The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports” due to the race’s approximate duration, the Derby is packed with anticipation and excitement as the horses run 1 1/4 miles, and typically finishes in under two minutes. Like most I love the pageantry, the crazy money invested in horses and of course all of those crazy amazing women’s hats.  I did a bit of digging, and found out May 17th, 1875 was the date of the inaugural race. This year marks the 150th anniversary! Here’s some fun info you can share at your mint julip party.  Thanks to Google, Wikipedia, the chunkychef.com, townandcountrymagazine.com, nbcbayarea.com, and YouTube for the info.  Enjoy!

The Kentucky Derby, known as “The Run for the Roses” or “The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports,” first ran on May 17th, 1875. The inaugural race was won by Aristides, ridden by Oliver Lewis, and trained by Ansel Williamson. The winning horse was owned by H.P. McGrath. At that first race there were approximately ten thousand spectators that came to watch Aristides win that inaugural race. The purse was $3,050, with first place receiving $2,850 and second place receiving $200. That purse is today’s money would equate to $70,483.28. The purse for 2024, which only goes to first five is over $3 million.

The Kentucky Derby is one of the oldest continuously held sporting events in the United States. The first live radio broadcast of the Kentucky Derby was in 1925, and the first live television coverage of the race was in 1952.

One of the most iconic symbols of the Kentucky Derby is the twin spires. These spires sit atop the grandstand at Churchill Downs, the venue for the Derby. The Twin Spires were constructed in 1895 and have been an iconic part of the race ever since. Video Here

A starting gate is used to ensure a fair start to the race. It helps in organizing the horses and jockeys before the race begins

The post position from which horses start is crucial. The most successful post position in Kentucky Derby history is post position 5 and 10, with nine wins. Being “on the inside” sometimes forces the horse to hug the rail and get cut off from the front.  Learn More Here

The song “My Old Kentucky Home” has been played at the Kentucky Derby since 1921. It is a tradition for the crowd to sing along as the horses make their way to the starting gate.  Song Here

The mint julep is the traditional beverage of the Kentucky Derby. This cocktail is made with bourbon, mint, sugar, and water. It has been the traditional beverage of Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby for nearly a century. Recipe Here

The winning horse of the Kentucky Derby is draped with a garland of roses. This tradition began in 1896 when the winning jockey, Ben Brush, was presented with a bouquet of roses. The red rose became the official flower of the Kentucky Derby in 1904, and the garland has been awarded to the winner ever since.

The Kentucky Derby is unique in that it is only open to three-year-old Thoroughbred horses. This adds to the excitement, as it’s a one-time chance for these horses to compete in the prestigious event. The Kentucky Oaks is a race for three-year-old Thoroughbred fillies (young female horses) held annually the day before the Kentucky Derby. It’s considered the premier race for fillies in the United States.

In 1973, Secretariat won the Kentucky Derby with a record time of 1:59 2/5, a record that still stands today. Secretariat’s performance in the Derby is considered one of the greatest moments in sports history.

Eddie Arcaro and Bill Hartack hold the record for the most Kentucky Derby wins by a jockey, each with five wins.  The trainer with the most Kentucky Derby wins is Ben A. Jones, who won six times between 1938 and 1952.

The Kentucky Derby is as much about fashion as it is about horse racing. Attendees often wear extravagant hats and outfits, adding to the pageantry and spectacle of the event. See Hats Here  I trust you all realize that this fashion is truly lost on me!

The highest attendance at the Kentucky Derby was recorded in 2015, with over 170,000 people attending the race.  The Kentucky Derby Festival, which precedes the Kentucky Derby, features more than 70 events and is attended by over 1.5 million people annually. Most never get to see the race live due to limited seating

The trophy awarded to the winner of the Kentucky Derby is made of 56 ounces of 14-karat gold and stands 22 inches tall. It has an estimated value of $200,000.

In 1970, Diane Crump became the first woman to ride in the Kentucky Derby. She rode a horse named Fathom and finished 15th.  African American jockeys dominated the early years of the Kentucky Derby. Between 1875 and 1902, 15 of the 28 derbies were won by African American jockeys.

In 1913, Donerail won the Kentucky Derby at odds of 91-1, making it the longest shot to ever win the race. A $2 winning bet paid $184.90.

During World War II, the Derby was not held due to the war effort. From 1942 to 1945, Churchill Downs was used as a military hospital. The Kentucky Derby in 2020 was also postponed from May 2 to September 5 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
In 2005, Giacomo won the Kentucky Derby at 50-1 odds, resulting in the second-highest payout in Derby history.  On a $2 bet for Win, Place, Show, Giacomo paid $102.60, $45.80, $19.80.

The nickname “The Run for the Roses” originated in 1925 when New York sports columnist Bill Corum first used the term. It refers to the blanket of roses draped over the winner of the Kentucky Derby.

The betting handle for the 2024 Kentucky Derby could exceed previous years. A conservative estimate might put the handle at around $200-250 million. A more optimistic estimate might put the handle closer to $300 million.

The Kentucky Derby is the first leg of the American Triple Crown, followed by the Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes. Only thirteen horses have won the Triple Crown, with the most recent being Justify in 2018.

After the Kentucky Derby The Preakness Stakes is the second leg of the Triple Crown, held two weeks after the Kentucky Derby. It is hosted at Pimlico Racecourse in Baltimore, Maryland, and the horses run 1 3/16 of a mile.

The Belmont Stakes, the third and final leg of the Triple Crown, is held three weeks after the Preakness Stakes. It is hosted at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. If a horse has won both the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, the Belmont Stakes becomes a highly anticipated event as it is their chance to win the Triple Crown.

The Belmont Stakes is considered the “Test of the Champion” due to its longer distance (1 ½ miles) compared to the Derby and the Preakness.

Only 13 horses have won the Triple Crown: Sir Barton (1919), Gallant Fox (1930), Omaha (1935), War Admiral (1937), Whirlaway (1941), Count Fleet (1943), Assault (1946), Citation (1948), Secretariat (1973), Seattle Slew (1977), Affirmed (1978), American Pharoah (2015), and Justify (2018).
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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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It’s Complicated

(top to bottom) Sampling of the most expensive (and coolest) watches at auction:
#1 $31.19 million, Patek Philippe Grandmaster Chime
#3 $17.75 million Rolex “Paul Newman” Daytona
#8 $7.259 million Patek Philippe Stainless Steel
#14 $5.48 million Rolex “Paul Newman Big Red” Daytona
#16 $5.48 million Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Concept Black Panther Flying Tourbillon
#20 $4.987 million Patek Philippe Stainless Steel
#21 $4.93 million F.P. Journe x Francis Ford Coppola FFC Blue
Full list, and details at the”Top Watches”  link below.

Complications. Just part of business, right.  Comes with the territory we’re told. We all know about them. For manufacturers and servicers, aside from just procuring raw materials and scheduling manufacturing, we face additional issues all the time – like processing time, production, storage, assembly, packaging, delivery, pricing, employees and so much more. At KHT, we revel in all these things, working hard every day to tackle your PIA (Pain in the @%$) Jobs! For each job, we jump in, test – problem solve then develop a solution for our customer’s unique needs – all the while juggling “complications” that may arise. The other night, while out with friends, a buddy of mine used the phrase “just another watch complication”.  I had to look it up when I got in front of a computer and smiled – yep – watch complications are real. And part of being a good steward of the KHT way, it’s what we do all the time.  I found some interesting info on why watch complications are real – adding layers of complexity each time adds just another set of challenges and solutions to get them right. So next time you are out shopping for a Patek Philippe Grandmaster Chime Ref. 6300A-010 (sold at Christie’s Auction for over $31M), be sure to check the complications to be sure everything is running smoothly.  Thanks to patek.com, teddybaldassarre.com, youtube.com, and hooinkee.com for the info.  Enjoy!

Top Watches
Click while reading – Time Tunes

The sub-dials on an analog watch aren’t just for show. They have a special purpose. However, to some people, watch complications are (surprise!) – complicated. Apart from taking up real estate on the watch’s dial, some of these watch complications can be difficult to use – and even more difficult to repair.

In layman’s terms, watch complications are features of a watch aside from telling the time. A watch that only shows the hours, minutes, and seconds is dubbed as having a simple movement. Even the day and date windows on the dial of your watch are already considered as watch complications.

The more complicated a watch is, the more difficult it is to assemble, design, and repair. Thus, making the watch more valuable. This makes it very desirable to a lot of watch enthusiasts, called horology lovers. Complications include:

The Day-Date complication is perhaps one of the most basic functions of a watch. As the name implies, it tells both the date of the month and the day of the week. This could come in handy whenever you’re filling out forms that require dates. Some people even find it more convenient than whipping out their phone to check the calendar.  A famous watch that bears this feature is the Rolex Day-Date. And no, the folks from Rolex aren’t too lazy to give it a more creative name. Its name is a reminder that it is the first-ever wristwatch that displayed the full day and date on the dial.

Developed by French-Swiss watchmaker Abraham-Louis Breguet, the Tourbillon’s original purpose was to increase a watch’s accuracy. What it does is that it counters the effects gravity has on the small parts of a watch. Watchmakers would pair it with a crystal window on the dial and watch lovers would huddle up and just watch the tourbillon spin. If truth be told, the tourbillon really is mesmerizing to look at.  (show link to a tourbillon)

You do not have to be an astronomer to appreciate the moon phase feature. In fact, it is one of the most highly-desired watch complications by scientists and non-scientists alike.

How many times did you have to adjust your watch’s date just because it couldn’t tell whether a month has no 31st date in it? It can get annoying especially if you’re dealing with a non-quick set date function.  No need to do that when your watch has a perpetual calendar complication. Not only does it know the number of days of each month. It also knows when it’s a leap year.

The Chronograph is used to measure the time elapsed the same way a stopwatch works. (it is a requirement for motorsport watches). It was originally invented to work with astronomical equipment. Soon, people started using it to time horseraces and then sports car races. This contributed to the deep connection between motorsports and horology.

Were you ever trapped on a boring date and want to subtly check your watch for the time without being rude? The Minute Repeater is the way to go, making sounds that tell the wearer what time it is. As an example, it would make two sounds of the same tone to indicate that it’s 2:00. It would then create a sound of a different pitch to indicate the minutes. This way, you wouldn’t have to glance at your timepiece to know what time it is.

GMT means Greenwich Mean Time. Simply put, it tells two different time zones at the same time. One easy way to tell that a watch has a GMT complication is if it has another big hand aside from the seconds and hour hands. This is one of the most common watch complications around.

What if you need to know the time from more than two different time zones? Enter the World Timer. This complication tells the time of multiple time zones of the world. The dial of a watch displays 24 cities as a representation for each time zone. For example, Hong Kong for GMT +8, etc. The user would then have to rotate the bezel to their preferred city. And as the bezel moves, the hour hand automatically jumps with it.

The Alarm is one of the oldest watch complications around and one of the most useful albeit we rarely see them in analogue watches anymore. The alarm complication of a wristwatch works just like your normal alarm clock. There is a separate alarm hand connected to a cam underneath the dial. The wearer then sets it to any time in a 12-hour period. When the desired time is met, it triggers a lever that powers a hammer which in turn hits a bell.

The Annual Calendar is just one step ahead of the Day-Date complication. It is basically a Day-Date with the added function of a monthly calendar. It can tell whether a month has either 30 or 31 days. With that said, the only time you would have to adjust it is in February. When the month only has 28 (or if it’s a leap year, 29) days.

Want to take your love for cosmology to another level? If the moon phase complication of your trusty wristwatch is not enough, you’ll love the Planetarium. This watch complication doesn’t just tell the time – it also tells you the positions of the planets in our solar system! Each of the planets on the dial orbit around the sun in real-time.

The Power Reserve Indicator is one of the most practical watch complications on this list – it tells the wearer if they should already wind their watch (think of it as the battery gauge on your phone).

The Tachymeter is usually paired with a Chronograph. While the latter is a stopwatch, the former measures speed. To put it another way, it calculates the elapsed time over a fixed distance. A rule of thumb is that the Chronograph is on the subdials of the watch and a Tachymeter is placed around the watch’s bezel.

The Jumping Hour is one of the watch complications that is a joy to look at. While the hands of clocks and watches traditionally sweep counterclockwise, the same cannot be said for the Jumping Hour. Instead, the hand jumps directly to the next hour as soon as the minute hand reaches 60. Not only is it aesthetically pleasing, but it is also more convenient, because the hour hand is always directly pointed at the middle of the current hour lessening confusion when reading the time.

Serious collectors do not buy high-complication watches because they need the features. Instead, they buy those because it is a symbol of excellent engineering. Whether these are outdated or not, watch complications are a mark of watchmaking virtuosity. Think of watch complications as trophies that you can show off to your friends or other watch enthusiasts.

If you think 14 complications on a watch are more than enough, then wait until you see the Vacheron Constantin Reference 57260 . It is heralded as the most complicated watch in the world. Indeed, this timekeeper contains 57 watch complications! The watch contains bells and whistles (quite literally) that you’ve never heard of! Among its watch complications range from the most basic to the most extra such as the date of Yom Kippur and Star Chart.

Plus a couple more cool videos!!
How Automatic Watches work:
Painstaking art of Luxury Watchmaking

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Yabba Dabba

I looooooooooove the Flintstones!!!!!  :))))))))))))))))))))

Ah, childhood memories. Most of them are just great. Like most families, many of my childhood memories revolved around the TV.  Afternoon cartoons, westerns, even space themes. Growing up, I can remember my brothers and sisters watching a whole bunch of movies and shows.  One of my favorites was/is The Flintstones.  Who can forget Fred, Wilma, Barney and Betty. And the kids. What great names – Peebles and Bamm-Bamm. I can still remember Fred on his tip toes bowling. I have to admit that a group of my friends often remind me of the Flintstones, especially on the golf course! “The Flintstones” went on to become an iconic American animated television series that aired from 1960 to 1966, produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. Here’s some fun trivia, and some memories I hope you’ll enjoy.  And, yes, I had to include a clip of the theme song. Thanks to YouTube, google and interestingfacts.com for the info. Enjoy!

“The Flintstones” holds the distinction of being the first animated series to air during primetime on American television. Premiering on ABC in 1960, it was initially broadcast in the evening, a slot traditionally reserved for live-action programs.

The creators of “The Flintstones,” William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, drew inspiration from the popular live-action sitcom “The Honeymooners,” starring Jackie Gleason. The character dynamics between Fred Flintstone and his best friend Barney Rubble mirror those of Ralph Kramden and his best buddy Ed Norton.

The catchy theme song of “The Flintstones” is instantly recognizable to many. Written by Hoyt Curtin, William Hanna, and Joseph Barbera, the song features the memorable refrain, “Flintstones, meet the Flintstones, they’re the modern Stone Age family.” Video clip: CLICK

Each episode typically ran for about 25 minutes, with a standard animation production process. Unlike modern animation techniques, which often involve computer-generated imagery (CGI), the show relied on traditional cell animation, a technique used prior to computers.

The original voice cast included Alan Reed as Fred Flintstone, Jean Vander Pyl as Wilma Flintstone, Mel Blanc as Barney Rubble, and Bea Benaderet as Betty Rubble. Alan Reed’s gravelly voice perfectly captured Fred’s personality, while Mel Blanc, famous for voicing many Looney Tunes characters, brought Barney to life.

Throughout its six-season run, “The Flintstones” featured numerous guest appearances by celebrities of the era. Notable guests included Ann-Margret (Ann Margrock), Tony Curtis (Stoney Curtis) , Gina Lollobrigida (Gina Loadabricks), James Darren (James Darrock) and even The Beach Boys, who played themselves and performed a concert in Bedrock.

Despite ending its original run in 1966, “The Flintstones” remains popular to this day. It continues to be syndicated worldwide and has been released on various home media formats,

“The Flintstones” became a cultural phenomenon, influencing various aspects of popular culture, including advertising, merchandise, and even language. Phrases like “Yabba Dabba Doo!” (Fred’s catchphrase) and “Bedrock” (a term for something old-fashioned) entered the vernacular.

Extra Trivia:
Harvey Korman: Known for his comedic roles on “The Carol Burnett Show” and in films like “Blazing Saddles,” Harvey Korman voiced various characters in “The Flintstones,” including The Great Gazoo, a little green alien exiled to Earth.

William Hanna and Joseph Barbera met when they were in their late 20s, as new hires in MGM’s fledgling animation department. Discovering that they shared similar comic sensibilities, they teamed up on 15 years of Tom and Jerry antics (clips: HERE ), earning two Oscar nominations for Best Short Subject, Cartoons. When MGM shuttered its animation department in 1957, the duo — intent on segueing into television — formed Hanna-Barbera Productions, and created the first animated half-hour series, The Huckleberry Hound Show. The president of distributor Screen Gems asked Hanna and Barbera if they wanted to collaborate on a primetime television cartoon — even though standalone cartoons had only been successful thus far as morning or afternoon kids’ programming. They accepted the challenge.

To engineer a hit with the viewership potential of Father Knows Best or Leave It to Beaver, Hanna-Barbera decided to focus their show on a suburban family — with some sort of unique twist. They brainstormed central characters who were Romans, Indigenous People, pilgrims, Appalachian people, and nomads. Then, animator Dan Gordon doodled two cavemen dressed in animal skins. His figures flanked a record player that had a live bird’s beak as its needle. Character designer Ed Benedict tried to add more features present in early humans, but at Barbera’s urging, he made the physiques more refined, even giving Wilma a stone necklace that resembled oversized pearls. The series was named after the primary caveman couple, then named The Flagstones.

Once, when asked to say, “Yahoo!” in Fred’s voice, Reed ad-libbed a replacement that became the character’s signature. “Yabba dabba do!” was inspired by the 1950s jingle for men’s hair product, Brylcreem (“A little dab’ll do ya”).

In 1961, Blanc survived a head-on car crash but spent two weeks in a coma and 70 days in the hospital. During this period, Barney was voiced by Daws Butler, the performer who voiced Fred in The Flagstones pilot, as well as Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear on The Huckleberry Hound Show. Upon Blanc’s release, he was temporarily confined to a body cast, and series recording sessions relocated to his home for about 40 episodes. Rounding out the core cast was Bea Benaderet, who had been Lucille Ball’s first choice to play Ethel on I Love Lucy. For four seasons, Benaderet took on The Flintstones’ second female lead, Betty Rubble, until she exited to star in Petticoat Junction. Geraldine “Gerry” Johnson portrayed Betty for the remaining seasons.

Despite its laugh track, The Flintstones embarked on nuanced storylines in its middle seasons about routes to parenthood. After Fred and Wilma became U.S. television’s first animated couple to sleep in the same bed, nine episodes were devoted to Wilma’s pregnancy with their daughter, Pebbles. During the following season, with Barney and Betty, the series acknowledged the plight of infertility, a rarely addressed topic on screen or in society at the time. The Rubbles eventually adopted a son, Bamm-Bamm. The Flintstones proved that there was a grown-up audience for animation.  Watching the reruns today with the grandkids certainly brings back great memories.

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Windy

This…is a post about wind. Don’t forget your hair brush!  :)))))))))

As we’re enjoying the somewhat spring like weather around here these days, an idea for a Friday blog hit me, literally!   I had stepped out for a walk around the  KHT campus, and had my hat blown off my head by a gust of wind.  Don’t worry I didn’t lose my trusty KHT hat!  I noticed how the wind changes throughout the day.  Often when I arrive at work in the wee hours of the morning, everything is calm, especially the lake.  Then as the day progresses, things pick up – it’s visible from my office, how the clouds then move west to east, or sometimes east to west. It is absolutely amazing how the wind reacts here in beautiful Cleveland, Ohio, especially when it follows the lakeshore!   One of the most basic atmospheric forces on Earth, wind powers farms, carves landscapes, carries ships, and holds up kites. I loved taking the girls to the park or beach and launching a kite, letting it rise until there was no line left then watching it dive and dart across the sky . Biking with the wind is wonderful, against the wind not so much!  Here’s some fun info on wind, and surprising info on the windiest cities (Wellington New Zealand wins on the world front).  So, hang on to your hat, be sure to click the music links, and enjoy!  Special thanks to google.com, scifi.com. scientificamerica.com and YouTube for the info and tunes.

Some Wind Music to listen to as you read:
HERE
HERE
and HERE

Wind Is Caused by Uneven Heating on the Earth
Ever wonder where the breeze on the beach comes from? It happens because during the day, the water warms up more slowly than the land next to it. This uneven heating causes changes in atmospheric pressure; warm air expands and rises, and the cool air from the water blows in to take its place. This is a smaller-scale example of how wind works throughout the world — on a grander scale, the difference in temperature between the equator and the North and South poles cause large, powerfully windy areas banding across the Earth. For my “scientific” friends reading, visit HERE for the specific explanation – all about colliding molecules.

Some Winds Reverse Course at Night
When wind rushes between water and land, the pattern is different depending on what time it is. During the day, the wind rushes inland — but at night, the land cools faster than the water, causing the wind to head back in the direction of the water. Pay attention to this phenomenon on your next long walk on the beach.

Can You Guess the Windiest US Cities?
Most would guess Chicago – and some Cleveland … but here’s the top 10 from top to bottom.  Boston, Oklahoma City, Buffalo, Milwaukee, Dallas, Kansas City, San Fran, Cleveland, Minneapolis, Virginia Beach…(Chicago is #12!)

There Are Five Major Wind Zones on Earth
Prevailing winds, such as trade winds, blow in one direction without stopping. There are five major wind zones on the planet, each with their own behaviors of prevailing winds: Polar easterlies are winds that blow from the east around the North and South poles. Westerlies blow in the other directions at midlatitudes, around the middle points between the poles and the equator — strongest at around 40 to 50 degrees latitude in the Southern Hemisphere, blowing past New Zealand and the lower edges of Australia and South America. Horse latitudes, at about 30 degrees on either side of the equator, are warm areas with calm winds. Trade winds are incredibly predictable, powerful, easterly winds that run through the tropics, named because of how vital they’ve been to seafaring, including trading ships, throughout history.  The doldrums, also known as the intertropical convergence zone, is a calm area where two bands of trade winds meet. The winds here are weak, and ships have been known to get stuck there.  (MAP of the zones)

Wind Energy Is Ancient Tech
Wind energy doesn’t just refer to turbine-generated wind power — it also refers to the sails of ships and the windmills that pump water or mill grain. Thousands of years ago, wind energy was propelling boats along the Nile River; ancient Egyptian art shows images of sailboats as early as 3300  BC. Before that, sails made from animal hide still probably powered single-log rafts.

The First Windmills Were in Asia
Windmills may conjure images of rural European areas, but the earliest windmills were water pumps in ancient China and grain mills in ancient Persia around 200 BC. Windmills were in heavy use in the Middle East in the 11th century AD, when traders brought the technology up north to Europe The iconic windmills in the Netherlands started cropping up around 1200 AD.   – Video of Windmills working in the Netherlands.

The Fastest Recorded Wind Was 253 MPH
In 1996, during Hurricane Olivia, an Australian wind meter recorded a wind speed of a whopping 253 miles per hour.. The previous record-holder was a 231-mile-per-hour gust in New Hampshire.

Wind Carries Dust From the Sahara Desert All Over the World
The Sahara Desert is unfathomably massive, covering 3.3 million square miles in northern Africa — but its impact spreads even farther. Pushed by powerful trade winds, dust from the desert can hit halfway around the world in Texas and Florida (among other states), usually in the summertime. It arrives in quantities large enough to cause health problems, especially in people with asthma or other respiratory conditions. (remember last summer’s air quality from the Canadian forest fires??).

Wind-Created Geographical Features Are Called Aeolian Landforms
The best-known landscape features caused by wind are dunes, mounds of sand that are critical to the ecosystems in coastal areas. But dunes are only one example of aeolian landforms (named for the Greek god of wind, Aeolus). Some are soft, like loess, collections of yellow or tan sediment usually deposited by wind, such as the notable loess deposits along the Missouri River in Iowa. Others are more dramatic, like ventifacts, which are rocks that are shaped by the wind and can form amazing shapes and structures.

And for your viewing Pleasure:
Wind VS Pedestrian Video 1
Wind VS Pedestrian Video 2
Man with Balloons vs Wind
Man & Hot Air Balloon vs Wind
Home Trampolines vs Wind
How One Man Flies Hundreds of Miles Using Balloons

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

I’m Board

Board games are soooo much fun. And their history is pretty darn interesting! Look at the image at second from bottom. That IS the oldest game in the world!! The Royal Game of UR is about 5,000 years old. And the guy at the bottom with the greatest beard in the world? Dr.Irving Finkel. He’s the guy from the British Museum who deciphered the rules of that game from clay tablets. Here’s a link to his video.  :))))))) And you can even get the oldest game in the world at TargetClick Here!

Every once in a while, we have one of those days were when Jackie and I decide it’s a good time to just stay in and play some board games.  Sometimes it’s raining, or we’ve had enough running around and just want to relax and play some games, or better yet, when the grandkids come over.  If you want to be humbled, try to beat a five-year-old in Chutes and Ladders … seems every time I make it up the board, old grandpa is sliding down the slide to begin my climb again. I of course had my favorites growing up – chess, checkers, Operation (talk about PIA (Pain in the @%$) Jobs!), and of course Monopoly (I liked to be the race car piece) Sometimes I would end up owning everything and sometimes I would quickly be watching everyone else from jail!).  I love  when the family crowds around a game and get all excited playing. One of my kid’s favorites is Settlers of Catan, but I have to admit I haven’t caught the bug for that one yet!  It got me to thinking about the history of games (phew-there’s a ton!). So, I jumped online and found some info I think you’ll enjoy.  Special thanks to medium.com,  thesprucecrafts.com, meeplemountain.com, fun.com and pastemagazine.com for the info. Have fun playing!

Board games are tabletop games that typically use pieces. Many board games feature a competition between two or more players. A player can win by capturing all opposing pieces, completing a course, or ending with a calculation of final scores or captured pieces/mone

The First Board Game (5000 BC)
Most people don’t realize board games are actually pre-historic, meaning we had board games before we had written language. So, what was the very first game?… most likely Dice! A piece that’s essential in most board games today was the basis of humanity’s oldest games. A series of 49 small carved painted stones were found at the 5,000-year-old Başur Höyük burial mound in southeast Turkey. These are the earliest gaming pieces ever found. Dice were eventually made from a large variety of materials, including brass, copper, glass, ivory, and marble. Dice from the Roman Era look very similar to the six-sided dice we use today.

A Royal Pastime (3100 BC)
Board games became popular among pharaohs in Ancient Egypt. Primarily, the game of Senet. The game has been found in predynastic and First Dynasty burials. Senet is featured in several illustrations from Ancient Egyptian tombs. By the time of the New Kingdom in Egypt (1550–1077 BC), it had become a kind of talisman for the journey of the dead. The game is even referred to in Chapter XVII of the Book of the Dead.

Tied into Religion (3000 BC)
With the popular growth of board games amongst royalty, they quickly became adopted by the working class. Soon after, they became tied into religious beliefs. One such game being Mehen. While a complete set of rules on how to play the game have never been found, we do know the game represents the deity, Mehen. The Sun Cult envisioned the god Mehen as a huge serpent who wrapped the Sun God Re in its coils (the game board itself mimics this). Players each begin with six marbles and one lion. Stick dice as depicted above determine movement. Players start at the tail, along the outer edge of the board, and move towards the center where the snake’s head rests. The players race to the center with their marble pieces. Once a marble reaches center, movement reverses and players move towards the start again. The lion piece is then put into play. This predatory piece is used to capture (eat) an opponent’s marble pieces.

Humanity’s Longest Running Board Game (2650 BC)
Many people think Backgammon has been played the longest out of all board games, however it’s actually The Royal Game of Ur. The game had been thought long-dead, superseded by backgammon 2000 years ago. However, game enthusiast and curator at the British Museum, Irving Finkel discovered the game’s rules carved into an ancient stone tablet. This makes The Royal Game of Ur the game that has been played longer than any other in world history. The game gets its name from its founding within the Royal Tombs of Ur in Iraq. There was also a set found in Pharaoh Tutankhamen’s tomb. The Royal Game of Ur was played with two sets, one black and one white, of seven markers and three tetrahedral dice (4-sided dice).

The First Evidence of Backgammon (2000 BC)
Ludus duodecim scriptorum was a board game popular during the time of the Roman Empire. The name translates as “game of twelve markings”, likely referring to the three rows of 12 markings found on surviving boards. The game tabula is thought to be a descendant of this game, and both are similar to modern backgammon.

The oldest game with rules known to be nearly identical to backgammon described it as a board with the same 24 points, 12 on each side. As today each player had 15 checkers and used cubical six-sided dice. The object of the game, to be the first to bear off all of one’s checkers, was also the same. The popularity of backgammon surged in the mid-1960s, in part due to the charisma of Prince Alexis Obolensky who became known as “The Father of Modern Backgammon”. He co-founded the International Backgammon Association, which published a set of official rules. Backgammon clubs were formed and tournaments were held, resulting in a World Championship, which was promoted in Las Vegas in 1967.

Becoming Part of Childhood (500 BC)
Board games were primarily played by adults in ancient cultures and with their deep roots in society, were quickly adopted by children. Although not technically a board game, one of the first games centered towards kids was Hop-Scotch. That’s right, it’s much older than you thought! The first references of Hop-Scotch date back to Roman Children around 500 BC. The game’s first recorded references in English-speaking world date back to the late 17th century, usually under the name “scotch-hop” or “scotch-hopper”. According to the Oxford English Dictionary the etymology of hopscotch is a formation from the words “hop” and “scotch”, the latter in the sense of “an incised line or scratch”

Chaturanga set
Chaturanga was played on an 8×8 uncheckered board, called Ashtāpada. The board sometimes had special markings, the meaning of which is unknown today. Soon after, the game was turned into its European variant, Chess emerged, which is played on the same 8×8 tile board. The earliest evidence of chess is found in Sassanid Persia around 600 AD. The game reached Western Europe and Russia by at least three routes, the earliest being in the 9th century. By the year 1000 it had spread throughout Europe. Introduced into the Iberian Peninsula by the Moors in the 10th century, it was described in a famous 13th-century manuscript covering shatranj, backgammon, and dice named the Libro de los juegos. These modern rules for the basic moves had been adopted in Italy and Spain. Pawns gained the option of advancing two squares on their first move, while bishops, and queens acquired their modern abilities. The queen replaced the earlier vizier chess piece towards the end of the 10th century and by the 15th century had become the most powerful piece. Consequently, modern chess was referred to as “Queen’s Chess” or “Mad Queen Chess”.

The Landlord’s Game (1903)
The Landlord’s Game was invented by Lizzie Magie, one of America’s very first board game designers. The game board consisted of a square track, with a row of properties around the outside that players could buy. The game board had four railroads, two utilities, a jail, and a corner named “Labor Upon Mother Earth Produces Wages,” which earned players $100 each time they passed it… Sound familiar? See board here

Magie had invented and patented The Landlord’s Game in 1904 and designed the game to be a practical demonstration of land grabbing with all its usual outcomes and consequences. She based the game on the economic principles of Georgism, a system proposed by Henry George, with the object of demonstrating how rents enrich property owners and impoverish tenants. Magie also hoped that when played by children the game would provoke their natural suspicion of unfairness, and that they might carry this awareness into adulthood.

In 1935 Magie sold her patent for The Landlords Game to Parker Brothers, which is now what we know as Monopoly. This game, which launched Parker Brothers into a massive success, was originally rejected by them. After their success with Monopoly, They went on to produce Risk, Sorry, Trivial Pursuit, and more. Lizzie Magie sold her original patent of the original game for $500.

There is so much more to know about board games:
History since the 1800’s
Tabletop gaming
Top games of all times
Since 2010

Now, it’s your turn.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
 

 

Oh Patrick

200+ year old paintings and drawings of our great revolutionary hero Patrick Henry. You can get prints of those paintings and plenty of Patrick Henry gear online. 

I love it when I can recall famous lines from movies, and thoughts or phrases from speeches. Now a buddy of mine has an almost encyclopedic memory so for him this is easy! Me not so much! Throughout mankind’s history, there have been many catchphrases that are still relevant today.  (“I have a dream, The only thing we have to fear is fear itself, Tear down this wall!” to name just a few). One of my favorites are the words from Patrick Henry, best known as a brilliant orator and major figure in the American Revolution. His famous words “Give me liberty or give me death!” were delivered nearly 250 years ago today and stand the test of time. Born May 29th 1736, he was an influential voice in the founding of our nation. What should still resonate with all of us today is / was the ability of one individual to stand up to governmental overreach!  Here’s to all the writers out there, and to those who drive themselves by conviction.  I salute you.  Special thanks to oxfordreference.com, redhill.org and Wikipedia.org for the info.  And be sure to click on the links and read a bit deeper – cool stuff!! Enjoy!

Patrick Henry was the son of John Henry, a well-educated Scotsman who served in the colony as a surveyor, colonel, and justice of the Hanover County Court.

As a youth, he failed twice in seven years as a storekeeper and once as a farmer. During this period he increased his responsibilities by marriage, in 1754, to Sarah Shelton. The demands of a growing family spurred him to study for the practice of law, and in this profession, he soon displayed remarkable ability. Within a few years after his admission to the bar in 1760 he had a large and profitable clientele.

His oratorical genius was revealed in the trial known as the Parson’s Cause (1763). This suit grew out of the Virginia law, disallowed by King George III, that permitted payment of the Anglican clergy in money instead of tobacco when the tobacco crop was poor. Henry astonished the audience in the courtroom with his eloquence in invoking the doctrine of natural rights, the political theory that man is born with certain inalienable rights.

Two years later, at the capitol in Williamsburg, where he had just been seated as a member of the House of Burgesses (the lower house of the colonial legislature), he delivered a speech opposing the British Stamp Act, a revenue law requiring certain colonial publications and documents to bear a legal stamp. Henry offered a series of resolutions asserting the right of the colonies to legislate independently of the British Parliament, and he supported these resolutions with great eloquence: “Caesar had his Brutus, Charles the First his Cromwell, and George III…” when he was interrupted by cries of “Treason! treason!” But he concluded, according to a likely version, “…may profit by their example. If this be treason, make the most of it.”

During the next decade Henry was an influential leader in the radical opposition to the British government. At the second Virginia Convention, on March 23, 1775, in St. John’s Church, Richmond, he delivered the speech that assured his fame as one of the great advocates of liberty. Convinced that war with Great Britain was inevitable, he presented strong resolutions for equipping the Virginia militia to fight against the British and defended them in a fiery speech with the famed peroration, “I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

The resolutions passed, and Henry was appointed commander of the Virginia forces, but his actions were curbed by the Committee of Safety; in reaction, he resigned on February 28, 1776. Henry served on the committee in the Virginia Convention of 1776 that drafted the first constitution for the state. He was elected governor the same year and was reelected in 1777 and 1778 for one-year terms, As wartime governor, he gave Gen. George Washington able support, and during his second term he authorized the expedition to invade the Illinois country under the leadership of George Rogers Clark.

After the death of his first wife, Henry married Dorothea Dandridge and retired to life on his estate in Henry county. He was recalled to public service as a leading member of the state legislature from 1780 to 1784 and again from 1787 to 1790. From 1784 to 1786 he served as governor. He declined to attend the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention of 1787 and in 1788 was the leading opponent of ratification of the U.S. Constitution at the Virginia Convention. This action, which has aroused much controversy ever since, resulted from his fear that the original document did not secure either the rights of the states or those of individuals

Henry was reconciled, however, to the new federal government, especially after the passage of the Bill of Rights, for which contributions assisted in creating lasting protections for individuals. Because of family responsibilities and ill health, he declined a series of offers of high posts in the new federal government.

In 1799, however, he consented to run again for the state legislature, where he wished to oppose the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions, which claimed that the states could determine the constitutionality of federal laws. During his successful electoral campaign, he made his last speech, a moving plea for American unity. He died at his home, Red Hill, before he was to have taken the seat.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

OMG BFF

What do OMG, BFF, SKU, USB, OU, YKK, PVC, OTIS and LOL have in common? Read on.

 

OMG BFF

By now, many of you know about our favorite saying here at KHT Headquarters… We Love Your PIA (Pain in the @%$) Jobs! Like many acronyms, for us, and our customers, it’s become our mantra – got an issue with a part… keeping you up at night? – send it our way and we’ll get right on it, saving you time and money… and headaches. Now my wife Jackie is absolutely amazing with acronyms, not my strength!  Some words and letters are such a familiar part of everyday life that they often go unnoticed. From markings on your electronics, food packaging, and clothes to the words you see on water bottles and inside elevators, here are the meanings behind some mysterious letters you might see every day, along with some everyday leaders from social media.  Enjoy, and thanks to interestingfacts.com and infocons.org for the info.

UL

The letters “UL” can be found on many things, including electric plugs, heaters, smoke alarms, and personal flotation devices. UL stands for “Underwriters Laboratories,” a company that’s been conducting product safety testing for more than a century. If an item meets UL’s safety standards, it earns the right to bear a “UL” mark.  The man who founded what became UL, William Henry Merrill Jr., got the idea to set up an electrical testing laboratory after being dispatched to check fire risks at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The Underwriters Electrical Bureau was founded in 1894, and Underwriters Laboratories was incorporated in 1901. UL began offering its label service to certify products it had tested in 1906.

CE

You may have spotted a “CE” on eyeglass frames, mobile phones (or their packaging), appliances, electronics, and more. CE stands for the French phrase “Conformité Européenne,” which means “European compliance.” The CE designation indicates an item has met the standards to be sold in the European Economic Area..

FCC

Mobile phones, earbuds, television stations, and other communication devices operate on radio frequencies. In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission checks to make sure these devices can function with no harmful interference. The FCC also ensures a device won’t overexpose users to radiofrequency (RF) energy.,

OTIS

OTIS refers to the Otis Elevator Company.  In the 1830s and ’40s, passengers regularly died in elevators when lifting cables broke. Inventor Elisha Graves Otis created an elevator safety brake, and in 1853, showed off his invention at New York City’s Crystal Palace Convention by ascending on an open platform, cutting the hoisting rope with an ax, and not falling thanks to the safety brake. Four years later, E.V. Haughwout and Company’s department store in Manhattan became the first business to use elevators equipped with this special brake.  After the Otis Elevator Company was founded in 1853 and Otis patented his invention in 1861, Otis elevators helped transform cities. (they made an elevator for the Eiffel Tower!) Today, the company continues to make elevators with the name “Otis” displayed inside, sticking to the same basic engineering principles that Otis originally used.

OU

For folks around here, it means Ohio University, and OSU is of course Ohio State University. But for people who don’t “keep kosher” they may have seen the letter “U” inside a circle on some food items and not have known this indicated the item was processed according to Jewish dietary laws. This letter “U” is actually inside an “O,” not a circle; “OU” stands for “Orthodox Union Kosher.” Some products may be marked with “OU-D” to indicate that they contain dairy or were made on equipment that handled dairy. “OU-P” tells people an item is kosher for Passover. “OU” isn’t the only way to signal that a food item is Kosher. A “K” inside a circle or a star are other well-known marks for kosher foods.

PET

You can find the letters “PET” on many plastic bottles. . PET is an acronym for the plastic “polyethylene terephthalate,” which is part of the polyester family of polymers. Above the word “PET” on these bottles, you’ll also usually see a 1 in a triangle made up of arrows. This is a recycling code. PET bottles can successfully be recycled, To see all the plastic codes/icons, click here: https://infocons.org/blog/2023/06/06/the-7-symbols-of-plastic-and-their-meanings/

USB

USB is such a familiar term that you may not be aware it’s an acronym for “universal serial bus.” USB really did live up to the “universal” part of its name. Before USB, serial ports, parallel ports, and more were used to connect external devices like keyboards, mice, and printers. USB made it possible for these different devices to hook up to computers via the same connection.

YKK

Zippers are part of our daily lives, whether on our jeans, coats, or bags, and as long as they work, they usually don’t receive intense scrutiny. However, a closer look at various zippers will likely reveal that many of them are inscribed with the letters “YKK.”  YKK stands for “Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikikaisha,” which roughly translates to “Yoshida Manufacturing Shareholding Company.” This company, founded in 1934, uses its own brass, polyester, threads, and even zipper machines. By controlling so much of the process, YKK can deliver high-quality zippers, and explains why half of the world’s zippers have YKK zippers.

QR

QR codes are those pixelated-looking black-and-white squares that you can scan with your phone for more information about something, whether it’s an advertisement or a piece of art. They’ve become ubiquitous, especially after the COVID-19 pandemic popularized contactless menus and payment. However, they’re very rarely called by their full name.

“QR” actually stands for “quick response,”. The technology was first developed by a Toyota subsidiary in the mid-’90s as a way to track auto parts.

UPC

You’ve probably noticed a UPC while out shopping, especially if you use self-checkout. It stands for “universal product code.” UPCs have two parts, both of which communicate information to a computer: a barcode, and a 12-digit product code called a Global Trade Item Number, or GTIN, includes a company code for the manufacturer and a product code for the item itself. Manufacturers have to buy each individual code from GS1, a nonprofit industry group that tracks everything.

SKU

You’ll most commonly see “SKU” in online shopping carts, but occasionally someone will use it as a synonym for “product.” It stands for “stock keeping unit,” and like UPCs, it keeps track of products for sale. Unlike UPCs, which are universal across different companies, a SKU refers to an inventory item internally within one company.

PVC

If you’re a crafter or handyperson, you’ve probably come across PVC pipe. Typically, it’s used in water systems from home plumbing to city utilities, but clever DIYers have used it for everything from storage to cosplay, because it’s waterproof, sturdy, durable, and cheap. PVC stands for “polyvinyl chloride.” One of the most-used plastics in the world.

 

VR and AR

You’ve probably seen the terms “VR” and “AR” in arcades, science fiction, and buzzy new technology products. VR stands for “virtual reality,” and refers to an environment that’s entirely simulated. Some gamers use VR headsets to immerse themselves fully in a video game with a full, 360-degree view of a digital world (check out the new Apple headset: https://www.apple.com/apple-vision-pro/  AR, or “augmented reality,” adds simulated digital elements to the actual world around you. If you’ve played Pokemon Go — which superimposes Pokemon characters and other game elements on top of your surroundings using a smartphone camera — you’ve experienced an augmented reality application.

GIF

GIF images — that’s Graphics Interchange Format — have been used for more than three decades, although these days they’re mostly used for brief animations. The format was invented in 1987 by the CompuServe internet service provider, and once upon a time it was often used for still images. Because it uses limited colors, it kept file sizes low, which was especially critical when internet speeds were much slower.,

PU

You may have seen “PU” a lot recently to describe PU leather, a material used to create clothing, accessories, and upholstery. PU stands for polyurethane, a kind of artificial material commonly used in spandex.

JPEG

JPEG stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group, which is the name of the committee that created the standard in 1983. It is a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital images, particularly for photographs. The JPEG compression algorithm works by reducing the file size of an image by selectively discarding certain information that the human eye is less likely to notice. This compression makes JPEG an efficient format for storing and transmitting digital images, as it reduces file sizes while still maintaining reasonable image quality.

And some favorite social media abbreviations:

LOL        – Laugh Out Loud

BRB       – Be Right Back

OMG     – Oh My God

FYI          – For Your Information

IMO       – In My Opinion/In My Humble Opinion

TBH       – To Be Honest

SMH      – Shaking My Head

BTW      – By The Way

ASAP    – As Soon As Possible

TFW       – That Feeling When

BFF        – Best Friends Forever (me and my loving wife Jackie!!)

The Acronym Song

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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