Always Refreshing

Gazpacho!! It’s as fun to say as it is to eat. Look for some cool and refreshing recipes below. And ENJOY!!!!! :))))))))))

During the summer, I sometimes get the opportunity to enjoy what some call “liquid salad”.  No, it’s not some new-fangled home brew made with hops and barley (although there is an idea there…) – it’s a famous dish handed down through the centuries in Spain – gazpacho. Served best cold, this dish is jam packed with summer fresh flavor.  I love the tomato versions, and also when a chef adds in watermelon or cantaloupe. Served with crusty bread, I’m good for two or three bowls until Jackie makes me stop. I jumped online and found a little history and some great recipes.  So, as your summer vegi garden begins to produce, be sure to save the tomatoes and cucumbers, onion and garlic and mix up a batch or two.  Be sure to chill it, and eat outdoors, to get the real experience of this amazing summer salad.  Enjoy!  If you have a family recipe, be sure to send it to me (skowalski@khtheat.com ) Thanks to the culturetrip.com, forum.wordconference.com, Wikipedia.org, youtube.com and spain-recipes.com for the info.

Yes, a gazpacho song to listen to while you read … possibly one of the oddest videos ever – by the end you’ll be dancing too!

  • This popular soup from the Andalusian area, an autonomous community of Spain, mostly known now for being served cold, has many different influences from Greece and Rome, but also from the Moor’s and Arab culture. Now Gazpacho has become a generic term for a cold soup that has a vegetable or fruit base or both , that has similar spices to the traditional.
  • Andalusia was a large farming area for olives and almonds, citrus , vineyards and cork trees. Centuries ago, field workers were given a food ration of read and oil. The stale bread with added garlic, oil and any vegetables pounded in a mortar with added water makes a thirst-quenching soup, in the blazing heat, and was easily assimilated to nourish the body.  Over time, different vegetables and almonds that were available were also added.  This soup evolved into different varieties, the most popular around the world is a tomato-based variety, served cold
  • No one really knows where the name came from.  One version says the word comes from a Greek word for a collection box in church where folks would put different shaped coins, even bread.  Others say the word has many Arab sounds in it. Spain was controlled by the Ottomans between the 8th and the 15th century.  Some say the word comes from a Hebrew word Gazaz which means break into little pieces while others say it probably comes from the old Latin word “Caspa” meaning fragments or little pieces. Join the discussion here.
  • While it was common for Roman soldiers to carry dried bread, garlic and vinegar to make the basics of this early soup, it was popularized in the Andalusian area of Spain.  In the 8th century it was overtaken by the Ottomans and the Moors from Morocco just across the Mediterranean sea and came over with a soup they called Ajo Blanco.
  • Historians speculate Christopher Columbus probably took this soup with him on his voyages from Spain.  When he brought back tomatoes, cucumbers and different peppers is when the soup evolved to its present state. Today, all kinds of things are added such as watermelon and cantaloupe to enhance the flavor.
  • A Spanish refrain says, “De gazpacho no hay empacho” – You can never get too much of a good thing or too much Gazpacho. It is great for any meal or snack and the left over can be used as a sauce for pasta.
  • Ladies would make this soup in the fields and it would make a perfect soup to quench the thirst of the field workers. This dish they are making is actually for a hot Gazpacho. The tomatoes are being skinned first.
  • The tomato, cucumber variety of Gazpacho is probably the most nutritious, being that it is mostly fresh vegetables.

Recipes:

This is popular in the Seville area of Spain. This is the traditional style that is most popular version outside of Spain.
Traditional gazpacho, with a touch of fresh watermelon.
Ajo blanco –  (literally means white garlic )
Popular in the Granada and Malaga region. This is a white soup that has bread, almonds, sometimes grapes, olive oil and of course bread and garlic.
This is popular in the Córdoba area of Spain and is smoother and richer. Salmorejo is a cream consisting of tomato and bread, originating in Córdoba (Andalusia) in the south of Spain. It is made from tomatoes, bread, oil, garlic and vinegar. Normally, the tomatoes are skinned and then puréed with the other ingredients. The soup is served cold and garnished with diced Spanish Serrano ham and diced hard-boiled eggs.

 

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Amazing & Beautiful

You know the saying, “A picture is worth …”

I came across these winners of the Wildart Photographers of the Year Awards – WOW!  Love the amazing detail and captured light.

Talk about a PIA (pain in the @%$) Job! – all the time and patience to get just the right image into the camera.

Congrats to all, and thanks to boredpanda.com for the post. And CLICK HERE to see even more!!

Enjoy!  And let me know your favorite at skowalski@khtheat.com.

Fun tune while you enjoy the images.  :)))))

 

 

 

 

All Tied Up

It is said that the tie makes the man. Read on to see how the man, and woman, makes the tie.

I read a post recently about a newscaster who is donating his extensive tie collection to young reporters and newscasters just coming into the profession – paying it forward so to speak. Millions of people wear them throughout the world, whether they’re going to work, a special occasion, church, or any other number of reasons. But why? You might think, ‘well, it allows men to express themselves’, or ‘people need a way to dress more formal’ or ‘it’s just tradition’. You wouldn’t be wrong, but the history of men’s neckties is far more complex than you might guess. Around here, we’re not much for formal wear – I like keeping things casual while we are enjoying all of those PIA (Pain in @%$) jobs that come in each day! , We lprefer to dress in KHT logo wear (email me if you’d like some KHT blin!).  I do love getting dressed up, while trying to matchmy ties, with my extensive sock collection. So, here’s a little history and some fashion tips to help you through the summer months.  Be stylish and proud!  Also, dig into your drawer, and send me your ugliest tie(s) – I’ll collect all the entries, and send a surprise gift to the winner, chosen by our receptionist – I know I have a bunch that are sure to compete).  Thanks to msn.com, youtube.com, esquire.com, Wikipedia.org, ascot.com, thetenaflyecho.com, and absoluteties.com for the insights.

Interesting Links:

  • Early ties hardly resemble the modern tie today as we know it. We can thank Croatians for the necktie, but the French made it the fashion staple it is today. The origin of the necktie can be traced back to the 17th Century, during the 30 Years’ War (1618-1648). The French hired Croatian mercenaries who woretraditional knotted neckerchiefs around their necks ( ) as part of their uniform. This held the top of their jackets together and was more practical than stiff collars.
  • Towards the end of the war, Croatian soldiers were being presented to French King Louis XIV. During his inspection, the king noticed these neckerchiefs and took a strong liking to them. The boy-king began wearing these himself around 1846, at just seven years old, according to the Dubrovnik Times. He named the early neckties “La Cravate,” after the Croatians who invented the fashion piece and is still the French word for necktie today. The king made cravats a mandatory accessory at royal gatherings. With the king and other nobility wearing cravats, the new fashion trend caught on like a wildfire across Europe.
  • As Europe changed over time, so did ‘La Cravate.’ Rather than its practical purpose used by the Croatians, neckwear became an indication of social status. Neckwear was worn by nobles who wanted to project power, wealth, elegance, and status.
  • In the 1800’s, the scarf became the most popular neckwear, though stocks, bandanas, and cravats were also worn. Beyond the evolution of cravat into different articles of clothing like scarves and bandanas, the tying of neckwear also became very important. A prominent pamphlet was published in 1818 called Neckclothitania, which detailed the most popular ways to tie neckwear, and in which circumstances the different knots were appropriate.
  • Neckties weren’t immune to the Industrial Revolution. With fabrics like cotton, linen, wool, and silk being able to be produced at a much more efficient and extensive rate than ever before, this fashion trend became much more common. Around this time, bow ties and ascots grew into popularity.
  • The name of the Ascot comes from the Ascot Heath, (https://www.ascot.com/royal-ascot-2023  ) a horse race in England and is the most formal type of tie. It was the formal morning neckwear of the Royal Enclosure at Ascot. Bow ties became popular among scholars and surgeons, and also came into popularity with the wealthy when wearing tuxedos.
  • Neckties continued to evolve and change with fashion and social trends into the 19th century. The origin of the necktie as we know and wear it today can be traced to a tie maker from New York in the 1920’s. Jesse Langford patented an entirely new way to make the tie; he would cut the fabric on an angle and sew it into three segments. This method is still used to this day. This was named ‘the Langford Necktie’, and the original design had ties that were much shorter than ties we are accustomed to.
  • Art Deco is a style of visual arts with the intent to look and feel modern; and was influenced by bold geometric and represented faith in social and technological progress. Some men in this same era wore kipper ties  as part of the ‘Bold Look’.
  • The 80’s were a wild time for fashion, with huge fashion trends like the hip-hop movement, New Romantic, and Miami Vice (how cool was Crockett and Tubbs!!). The 80’s are remembered for its bright and bold colors and patterns. At this time, wide ties began to be synonymous with older men; younger people started wearing narrower ties that were reminiscent of the 1950’s. Novelty ties also grew into popularity, with ties with specialty prints and crazy designs like the piano key tie and thousands of other fun and zany patterns.
  • The 90’s tie styles were very similar to the 80’s, but tended to be wider. Paisleys and colored floral prints became popular at the end of the 20th century. The 1990’s are also responsible for the shift into business casual, with business moguls like Bill Clinton and Steve Jobs ditching the full suits for more comfortable and casual dress.
  • Alternative options for people who want a faster and easier option to traditional ties are clip on ties, zipper ties, and the Modern Tie. No one is certain who invented the clip-on tie, but it is a great option for kids and those who want a more convenient option. Clip on ties have a metal clip at the top of the knot that clips on the backside of a shirt. Downsides to this is that the metal bar can irritate necks and can be seen by others. Zipper ties are essentially a pre-tied tie that is adjusted by a zipper.  You fully unzip the tie and put it over your head and then zip it up to specific neck size of the individual wearer.

Making a Handmade Tie – (talk about a PIA (Pain in the @%$ Job!).

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
 

 

 

Ruff Livin’

The dog – person emotional connection is so amazing. If one lives with you, you know exactly what I mean. Puppy love. . . yeah, it’s a thing. 

Dogs.  Dogs have always been, and continue to be, one of our most loyal companions, providing love, help and comfort in so many ways. Most often, dogs are a loyal addition to families everywhere. They can be best friends, always ready to play or hunters, tracking through forests with the keenest senses. In some settings, dogs are rescue and guard animals, by the sides of police officers, firemen and EMS members. Sometimes, they are sled dogs, pulling people and cargo through cold wintry terrain or therapy dogs assisting in living daily life. But most often, they are just part of our households.  One thing that’s vital to a dog’s wellbeing and longevity is a good place to rest and sleep.  A recent article in Smithsonian Magazine shares a fun story, when the great  Frank Lloyd Wright agrees to design a doghouse for a little boy.  For all my “dog loving” readers out there, here’s some fun info about dog houses – be sure to check out the video on “over the top” designs.  And send me your stories on doghouses you’ve built – pictures too! (skowalski@khtheat.com). Special thanks to youtube, smithsonianmag.com, embarkvet.com and thehousedesigners.com for the info and images.  Enjoy!

Tune from Buddy Jones
Tune from Bobby Monroe (and his dogs)

  • For the longest time, domesticated dogs simply inhabited the outdoor elements. The earliest known structures were kennels made of mud. Doghouses would not become a commodity for people until well into the nineteenth century, but even at that point, design would remain extremely crude, as they were made of whatever material owners could scrape together.
  • Eventually, canine homes started becoming mass-producible in factories, which allowed for better materials such as framing lumber and plywood that resisted weather and proved sturdier over time. But a dog’s place of rest and retreat was still arguably very uncomfortable and not completely protective yet. By the 1960s, companies began switching over to making plastic doghouses, the style of which became a much more popular way to go, and things were looking up for the canines.
  • In the past couple decades DIY doghouses have become a growing trend as owners focus on keeping their dogs safe and comfortable when outdoors. There really is much to consider in giving our beloved pets the best possible home away home, but with today’s modern offerings, keeping them comfortable and protected can be easy, stylish, and even environmentally friendly.
  • The changing seasons, depending on where you live, can test the suitability of a doghouse all year round with different kinds of weather. For one, a dog’s space is a shady refuge for your pet from the summer heat. Yet some features can really enhance this luxury for them, such as ventilators that can be closed in the winter months, or fans with quiet motors that won’t disturb the animal when sleeping.
  • If having your dog stay in their home during the colder winter months becomes a necessity, you can fret less by getting insulated materials, such as special siding that both resists weather and prevents rotting over long periods of time. Doggie doors can also be made of insulated and durable material, and to truly keep the structure toasty warm you might also consider pet heaters, which can be weather-resistant and thermostat regulated.
  • Doghouses can be built with better and more earth-friendly materials, such as sustainable roofing shingles that can make for trendy but also energy efficient doghouse coverings. There are options for recyclable material for both roofing and flooring that still look great and resist scratching and molding.
  • Solar power is becoming increasingly available for doghouses as well. Heaters and fans can keep your pet cozy any time of year. They can be completely solar powered, charging up in the daytime and working capably at night. Lighting might be another important factor for your pet’s space, so consider solar powered and LED options.
  • Of course, the look of your dog’s space or house can be just as vital a step in the process to giving them the best possible personal home. If one fancies that classic feel of an actual dog ‘house’, they can come in a variety of models that would match the very style of your own home, from rustic to ranch to even Greek-revival! Everything, from the construction to accessories to coloring can be chosen today, with limitless options, to get the exact look and feel both you and your companion adore.
  • See some outrageous dog houses
  • Finally, it would take way too many pages / pictures to show all of the options for the inside of your homes!  So just do what makes sense, and love those doggies!

 

 

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Freedom

Let’s celebrate

together the incredible

freedoms we have

here in the USA.

Enjoy your 4th of July break

with family and friends.

•     •     •     •     •     •    From    •     •     •     •     •     •



All of Us at
Kowalski
Heat Treating

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