Flakey

Who hasn’t enjoyed corn flakes? I’ve certainly had my share.  :))))))))))  In row six are brothers John & Wil Kellogg. If they could only see the cereal aisle today!!

Rise and shine. Up and at ‘em. Fall in. Giddyap Cowboy. Let’s Do This! So many ways to kick off your morning. And, of course, for so many, it includes a hot cup of Joe and a bowl of cereal.  For me most often I start my day with a smoothie (email me for my recipe skowalski@khtheat.com), but I will indulge in a bowl of cereal every now and then.  Today my favorite go to cereal is Cheerios Oat Crunch Cinnamon (my grandkids like it too!). Growing up, I loved Captain Crunch or Raisin Bran. There was also a special breakfast that consisted of Frosted Flakes, vanilla pudding, and fruit cocktail which to this day is amazing! . Today marks the day one (or two or three) inventors patented a flakey cereal we still enjoy.  I’m a huge fan of inventors – I’m surrounded by them every day, as they tackle your PIA (pain in the @%$) Jobs! Thanks to John, Ella and Will Kellogg, the breakfast cereal was born. Kellogg’s has a rich history, and their flaked cereal is no exception. Here are some fun history and facts about Kellogg’s flaked cereal. Special thanks to Google, Wikipedia and lekkanovaus.com for the info.  Enjoy!

A Million A Day – Cereal Production Video

Corn flakes, or cornflakes, are a breakfast cereal made from toasting flakes of corn (maize). Originally invented as a breakfast food to counter indigestion, it has become a popular food item in the American diet.

The development of the flaked cereal in 1894 has been variously described by John Kellogg, his wife Ella Eaton Kellogg, his younger brother Will, and other family members. There is considerable disagreement over who was involved in the discovery, and the role that they played. According to some accounts, Ella suggested rolling out the dough into thin sheets, and John developed a set of rollers for the purpose while Will said it was his idea from the start. (siblings – ha!).

According to John, he had the idea in a dream, and used equipment in his wife’s kitchen to do the rolling. It is generally agreed that upon being called out one night, John Kellogg left a batch of wheat-berry dough behind. Rather than throwing it out the next morning, he sent it through the rollers and was surprised to obtain delicate flakes, which could then be baked.

Will Kellogg was tasked with figuring out what had happened and worked to recreate the process reliably. Ella and Will were often at odds, and their versions of the story tend to minimize or deny each other’s involvement, while emphasizing their own. Tempering, the process the Kellogg’s had discovered, was to become a fundamental technique of the flaked cereal industry. Tempering is a favorite process here at KHT!!

A patent for “Flaked Cereals and Process of Preparing Same” was filed on May 31, 1895, and issued on April 14, 1896, to John Harvey Kellogg as Patent No. 558,393. Significantly, the patent applied to a variety of types of grains, not just to wheat. John Harvey Kellogg was the only person named on the patent. Will later insisted that he, not Ella, had worked with John, and repeatedly asserted that he should have received more credit than he was given for the discovery of the flaked cereal.

The flakes of grain, which the Kellogg brothers called Granose, were a very popular food among the patients at the Battle Creek Sanitarium. Learn More Years later, Kellogg’s expanded its line of flaked cereals to include various grains, such as rice, wheat, and oats, to cater to different tastes and dietary needs.

In 1906, Will Keith Kellogg, who served as the business manager of the sanitarium, decided to try to mass-market the new food. At his new company, Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, he added sugar to the flakes to make them more palatable to a mass audience, but this caused a rift between his brother and him…surprised?

In 1907 his company ran an ad campaign which offered a free box of cereal to any woman who winked at her grocer (imagine that today?). To increase sales, in 1909 he added a special offer, the Funny Jungleland Moving Pictures Booklet, which was made available to anyone who bought two boxes of the cereal. This same premium was offered for 22 years.

At about the same time, Kellogg also began experimenting with new grain cereals to expand its product line. Rice Krispies, his next great hit, first went on sale in 1928. (one of my “go to” favorites!) Snap, Crackle, Pop!

There have been many mascots of Kellogg’s Cornflakes. The most popular one is a green rooster named Cornelius “Corny” Rooster, which has been the mascot since his debut. In early commercials, he would speak the catchphrase “Wake up, up, up to Kellogg’s Cornflakes!” Dallas McKennon and Andy Devine voiced him. Later, he stopped talking and simply crowed.  I personally think that Tony the Tiger is one of the best mascots ever – “ They’re Great”!) Commercials

See list of Top 20 Breakfast Cereals – (see how many you have eaten)

Kellogg’s flaked cereal has come a long way since its accidental invention, shaping not only the breakfast habits of millions but also becoming a part of global culture. Kellanova (formerly Kellogg’s) in 2022 had worldwide net sales around 15.3 billion U.S. dollars. Kellanova is a multinational consumer goods company with a focus on breakfast cereals and convenience foods. Learn more

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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That’s Bananas

Have you heard any of these?  1. Why do bananas have to wear sunscreen? If not, they’ll peel. 2. Why don’t bananas snore? They don’t want to wake up the rest of the bunch. 3. How does a banana answer the phone? Yellow. 4. Where do bananas go to get educated? Sundae school. 5. Why was the monkey attracted to the banana? Because it had appeal. 6. What type of key opens a banana? A monkey. 7. Why was the banana sent to the hospital? Because it had yellow fever. 9. What is a sheep’s favourite fruit? Baaa-nana. 12. What to do if you see a blue banana? Try to cheer it up. 13. Why did the banana go out with a walnut? Because he couldn’t find a date. 14. What do you call two bananas? A pair of slippers. 15.What was Beethoven’s favourite fruit? Ba-na-na-naaa.  Ok, I’ll stop now..  :))))))))))))

I have a whole bunch of habits and favorites (wearing crazy socks, sausage gravy, baked beans – I could go on). One of my favorite breakfast meals is a fresh smoothie.  As an early bird, it’s perfect for me – open the fridge, find some ingredients, into the blender with yogurt, frozen berries, orange juice a little spinach and finally peanut butter!  Bingo, I’m set. Of course, I have my favorite ingredients (list), including a fresh banana.  The banana gives it a wonderful smooth flavor and it’s packed with vitamins and potassium I need to keep my KHT energy engine going. It got me to thinking about smoothie ingredients, and especially bananas.  I found some fun facts online and wanted to share. Thanks to facinatingfacts.com, chat.openai.com and foodnetwork.com for the info.  And be sure to click on the smoothie recipe below.

Starter recipe

A banana is the common name for a type of fruit and also the name for the herbaceous plants that grow it. These plants belong to the genus Musa. They are native to the tropical region of southeast Asia. Historians think the first people to grow bananas for food lived in Papua New Guinea.

There’s no wrong way to eat a banana — in a smoothie, underneath a mountain of ice cream, or even green (according to a 2019 poll, 5% of Americans prefer bananas in that unripened state). This grocery store staple is one that humans have been eating for at least 6,000 years, with no sign of slowing anytime soon; on average, people around the globe eat 130 bananas per year. Here are facts to highlight a few things you may not know about one of the planet’s most beloved fruits.

Bananas are one of the oldest cultivated fruits. Evidence suggests that they have been cultivated for over 7,000 years. Bananas are typically harvested green and ripen as they age. The ripening process can be accelerated by exposing bananas to ethene gas.

Ecuador is the world’s largest exporter of bananas.

The term “banana republic” originated from the economic and political dominance of banana-exporting countries in Central America. It was first coined by the American author O. Henry in the early 20th century.

Bananas made their U.S. debut in Philadelphia in 1876, sold to fairgoers attending the Centennial Exhibition (the first world’s fair held in America). For 10 cents, visitors could purchase a foil-wrapped banana and get a taste of a fruit many had never seen before. Today, bananas are one of the most popular fruits among American snackers, who consume an average of 13.2 pounds per person each year.

While banana trees can reach upwards of 40 feet tall, these lumbering plants technically aren’t trees — they’re instead considered giant herbs.

The way scientists classify berries doesn’t always jive with how fruit eaters categorize them. That’s certainly the case for bananas, which are botanically berries. To be considered a true berry, a fruit must develop from a flower that contains an ovary; bananas form from nearly foot-long flowers that meet this criteria.

Bananas are radioactive (you won’t need a Geiger counter to pick out a bunch of bananas at the supermarket). The potassium in bananas contains trace amounts of radioactive atoms, though because our bodies regularly flush the nutrient out, it’s unable to build up to dangerous levels in our system. Bananas aren’t the only radioactive food: spinach, potatoes, and oranges are, too.

Banana peels are not just waste; Some people use them as a natural fertilizer, polish shoes with the inside of the peel, or even use them to whiten teeth. Bananas can also purify water – researchers experimenting with ways to remove heavy metals from water have found that banana peels can get the job done. a 2011 study found that minced banana peels were able to quickly remove lead and copper from water. (you are all set next time you’re marooned on an island).

There are more than 1,000 species in the banana family, though it’s rare to see more than one kind at the grocery store. More than 55 million tons of Cavendish bananas are harvested each year, making them the most popularly grown and consumed species. Cavendish bananas get their name from William Spencer Cavendish, Britain’s sixth Duke of Devonshire, whose estate was home to numerous exotic plants. The duke’s eponymous banana stalks would eventually play a huge role in worldwide banana production — all modern Cavendish banana plants are descendants from those grown at the U.K. estate in the 1830s.

Contrary to popular belief, not all monkeys and apes love bananas. In the wild, they eat a variety of fruits, and bananas are just one of many options.

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Stay In

Just have fun!  :))))))

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, I’ve been thinking about what to do this year. It’s one of my favorite days of the year, as I get to share some extra love for my amazing wife Jackie, my beautiful daughters and their significant others, and of course the grandkids. I thought about the traditional candy and flowers and goodies and a night out – but think what I’ll try this year is to just stay home and make a fun meal together with Jackie. And try to have some of the family over too!  Now I’m not a chef – although I certainly know my way around the kitchen!  It is amazing how many bowls I can use while preparing the sumptuous feast! I went online and typed in “homemade Valentine’s Day dinners” and boom, up came tons of ideas. According to the writers, “whatever Valentine’s dinner ideas you choose, it’ll be fine. The care you put into cooking for someone is much more important than whether you splash out on caviar and lobster or spend half your grocery budget on a bottle of Champagne. None of those things are Jackie and I anyway. Jackie just has fun with me asking her questions on various seasonings and cooking times. Below are links to recipes including creamy pastas, easy risotto, impressive but foolproof soup, yummy steaks, and more. (I have chosen some of my favorites to get you going). Once your main course is settled, it’s time to start thinking about simple appetizers, dessert (something chocolate of course), wine or your favorite beverage of choice. Have fun– and wish me luck in the kitchen!  Special thanks to foodnetwork.com, delish.com and millesimal.com for the ideas and YouTube.com for the tunes.  ENJOY!!

34 Special Recipes
Steve’s Picks: Check out – You Won’t Be Single for Long Vodka Cream Pasta, Beef Wellington, Prosciutto, Brie and Apricot Crostini, Surf and Turf sans the asparagus.

50 Romantic Dinners
Steve’s Picks: Check out – Creamy Steak Fettuccine, French Onion Gnocchi Soup, , Honey Garlic Salmon,  + boyfriend steak! ( Nothing like a good steak!)

Best Wines to Compliment
Steve’s Picks: Check Out – ALL!

YouTube Dinner Music

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Bittersweet

Any way you slice it, grapefruits are good and good for you!  :))))

As we roll into the early winter season (yep still rolling from my indulgence on Turkey Day), I find there are some foods that are just part of the season.  One of my favorites is grapefruit.  There’s something special about “winter” grapefruit – cold, tangy, sweet, and just the perfect kick-starter to my day. Eggs, bacon, sausage, waffles, toast, juice, coffee, pastry, potatoes … and of course a half of grapefruit to complete my “healthy” meal. Of all the flavors, I think pink is my favorite – especially when I sprinkle a little sugar on top. I got to thinking about the “good” and the “bad” about grapefruit (I am amazed by the number of adverse effects that occur when mixing with medicines) and decided to do some digging. Here’s some trivia and info I think you’ll enjoy. Thanks always to Wikipedia, YouTube, Google and liquor.com for the info.  Watching both the harvesting and the packaging videos below is absolutely incredible and mesmerizing!

Mechanical Harvesting
Clean, Pack and Ship

Grapefruit (Citrus × paradisi) is believed to be a crossbreed between a sweet orange and a pomelo. It was first discovered in Barbados in the 18th century. There are different varieties of grapefruit, including white, pink, and red, each with its distinct flavor and color intensity.

Grapefruit is a low-calorie fruit that packs a nutritional punch. It is an excellent source of vitamin C, providing over 70% of the recommended daily intake in just one serving. Additionally, it contains fiber, potassium, and various antioxidants, contributing to overall health.

The flavor of grapefruit is a distinctive combination of sweet and tart notes. The bitterness of grapefruit comes from compounds known as furanocoumarins, which are responsible for its unique taste making grapefruit a versatile ingredient in both sweet and savory dishes.

Grapefruit has gained popularity as a “weight-loss fruit” due to studies suggesting its potential impact on weight management. Some research indicates that incorporating grapefruit into a balanced diet may help reduce overall calorie intake and contribute to weight loss.

Certain compounds in grapefruit, particularly naringin, have been studied for their potential effects on metabolism. Naringin has been associated with increased fat burning and may have implications for metabolic health. However, more research is needed to fully understand these effects.

One of the most well-known trivia about grapefruit involves its interaction with medications. Consuming grapefruit or its juice can interfere with the metabolism of certain drugs by inhibiting a key enzyme in the liver. This can lead to higher-than-intended levels of the medication in the bloodstream, potentially causing adverse effects. Medications such as statins, antiarrhythmics, and immunosuppressants are among those affected, making it essential for individuals on medication to be cautious about their grapefruit intake.

While relatively rare, some people may experience allergic reactions to compounds found in grapefruit. These reactions can range from mild itching and skin rashes to more severe symptoms like difficulty breathing.

Some studies have explored the potential anti-cancer properties of compounds found in grapefruit. Certain antioxidants and phytochemicals present in the fruit have been investigated for their ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. While research is ongoing, these findings highlight the multifaceted nature of grapefruit’s impact on health.

For individuals managing diabetes, grapefruit might be a surprising addition to their dietary considerations.

Major grapefruit-producing countries include the United States (particularly Florida and Texas), China, South Africa, and Mexico. The fruit is typically harvested during the winter months when it reaches peak ripeness.

About 585 million tons is harvested in the US each year – yeeowsa! For those mathematicians out there, this would be about 2,500,000,000,000 grapefruit!! Which is 2 trillion five hundred d billion!

Beyond being enjoyed fresh, grapefruit adds a zesty flavor to a variety of dishes. It is used in salads, cocktails, marinades, and desserts, showcasing its versatility in both sweet and savory culinary creations. It’s a popular beverage, either on its own or as a mixer in cocktails.

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

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Steve’s Day

I’ve been thinking about this…if I could rename every day of the week, I’m thinking food might be a good idea. Hey, why not?  :)))). Read on to see why the days of the week are named what they are.  (But I still think food might be good.)

 

Wouldn’t that be cool – to have a day named after you? It turns out, as times have changed, so have our names for the days of the week. Dating back to the Babylonians (and Samarians) as the system was fairly simple – they gave a day of the week to each of the seven celestial bodies they knew – the sun, moon, and five planets (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn). Our current naming system comes from an amalgamation of the Babylonian, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse mythologies for those seven main celestial bodies — one of the last remaining vestiges of Norse mythology in our regular vernacular. Special thanks to Google, Wikipedia, interestingfacts.com, and all those cool gods and their respective virtues. Enjoy!

The seven-day week originated from the calendar of the Babylonians, which in turn is based on a Sumerian calendar dated to 21st-century B.C. Seven days corresponds to the time it takes for a moon to transition between each phase: full, waning half, new and waxing half. Because the moon cycle is 29.53 days long, the Babylonians would insert one or two days into the final week of each month.

Monday – The first day of the week got its name from the first object we see in the night sky: the moon. Formerly spelled monedæi, which comes from the Old English words mōnandæg and mōndæg (literally “moon’s day”), it’s traditionally considered the second day of the week rather than the first. That links it back to our Nordic friends, who reserved the second day of the week for worshipping Máni, their personification of the moon. The name Mona is also part of a related tradition: It’s the Old English word for “moon,” and girls born on Monday in ancient Britain were sometimes given this name as a result.  Moon symbolism often carries associations with femininity and emotions, which might explain why Monday is often associated with a case of the “Monday blues.”

Tuesday – Whether you consider it the second day of the week or the third, Tuesday is named for the god of war. For the Anglo-Saxons it was Tiu, while the Vikings called him Tyr; split the difference and you come up with something close to Tuesday. That also explains why Romance languages have similar-sounding names for the day: mardi (French), martes (Spanish), and martedi (Italian) all come from Mars, the Roman god of war. Týr’s association with war makes Tuesday a fitting day for taking action and tackling challenges.

Wednesday – Another day, another mythological god. Traces of the Latin term dies Mercurii, or “day of Mercury,” can again be found in the Romance languages: mercredi (French), mercoledì (Italian), and miércoles (Spanish). “Wednesday” itself is derived from the Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, which means “day of Woden” — another form of Odin, the god of all gods in Norse mythology. (Anglo-Saxon paganism owed some of its practices to Nordic culture, hence the crossover.). Odin was associated with wisdom and poetry, making Wednesday a day often associated with intellect and communication.

Thursday – If you’re familiar with a certain hammer-wielding god of thunder, you already know for whom Thursday is named: Thor, the popular Norse god (I’m a big fan!). Thursday was called Þūnresdæg in Old English, whereas the Romance languages (like French, which has it as jeudi) deriving from Latin (dies Iovis) name the day after Jupiter. That’s no coincidence, as Jupiter was the Roman god of the sky and thunder, not to mention the king of all gods.  Thor’s association with thunderstorms and strength and Thor’s hammer, Mjölnir, is a well-known symbol of this day.

Friday – The last day of the traditional workweek derives its English name from a Norse deity, but its origin is a bit murkier than the others. Coming from the Nordic goddess Freyja and the Germanic goddess Frigg, it was called Frīġedæġ in Old English. Confusion sets in when you delve into the theory that the two goddesses are actually one and the same. Frigg was known to be wise and have the power of foresight, while Freyja rode a chariot led by two cats and personified everything from love and beauty to fertility and war – she’s the most important Nordic goddess. This day has often been associated with love, romance, and social gatherings.

Saturday – This one’s simple: Saturday is named for Saturn. That’s because, according to second-century astrologer Vettius Valens, the ringed planet controls the day’s first hour. The heavenly body itself is named after the Roman god of wealth and agriculture, and various languages’ names for the day are more similar than most: Sæturnesdæg in Old English, dies Saturni in Latin, samedi in French. A slight exception is German, which has two terms for Saturday: Samstag is the more commonly used, but Sonnabend (“Sun-evening”) is sometimes used in northern and western Germany. Saturn was associated with agriculture and time, making Saturday a day for both work and leisure.

Sunday – You guessed it: Sunday is named for the sun. In German, Sonntag is Sunday, which derives from sonne, their word for sun. In Latin, dies solis translates as “day of the sun” or “day of Sol,” a Roman sun god. Similarly, Norse mythology personified the sun in the form of Sól, a goddess also known as Sunna (who happens to be the sister of Monday’s Máni, the moon). Sun worship was prevalent in these societies, and Sunday was reserved as a day of rest and celebration.

Steve’s Day – if it did happen, it would be known for very high intellect of course (hey, it’s my day ok??) from the god Coeus (smarts for solving your PIA (Pain in the @%$) Jobs!, fun, family and food. Derived from the ancient gods Venus (love and beauty), Gelos (fun and laughter) Zeus (god of family) and Dionysus (food, feast, festival). No one would have to work of course on  my day – but must spend time frolicking with family and friends. Here’s to Steve’s Day!!

 

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Gourdy

MMM-mmm-GOOD!!!!!  There’s a pumpkin soup recipe for every taste. Actually, I think I can taste them all!!!  :))))))))

As we all gradually slide into Fall, I realize that my taste buds are also changing (of course I never lose my appetite).  Over the summer I think I’ve had my fill of watermelon and hot dogs and burgers and potato salad and barbecues. In Fall, I start thinking about heavier meals, things like chili and stews and clam bakes and Oktoberfest sausages and cheese dip and big fruity pies and … I could go on.  And with all the Fall pumpkin decorations abound, I also think about pumpkin soup.  Now I know not everyone is a fan, but I must admit, on the right day, with a chill in the air, and sour cream as a topping in the fridge, I’m all in.  A hot bowl of soup, some crackers, and a triple decker “Stevie special” sandwich – and it’s a good day at the Kowalski house (thanks Jackie!!).  Here is a little trivia and a few recipes to try – I like them both although I would like to see some of these recipes with some good kielbasa added with a hint of heat! Thanks to Google.com and possible.in for the info.  Enjoy!

Pumpkin soup has a rich history that dates back to the Native American cultures who used pumpkins and other squashes to create nourishing soups long before the arrival of Europeans in North America.  Its vibrant orange color and savory flavor make it a perfect addition to the holiday feast.

Pumpkin soup is not only delicious but also a healthy choice for those looking to boost their immune system and maintain good eye health as pumpkins are packed with nutrients, including vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. I will always toss in the part about being good for you, that means I get to have multiple helpings!  Learn more HERE

Pumpkin soup is prepared differently in various parts of the world. Here’s some variations:

  1. American Pumpkin Soup: In the United States, pumpkin soup is often associated with Thanksgiving and fall. It is typically made with pumpkin puree, broth, cream, and spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. Some variations include adding maple syrup for sweetness or a touch of heat with cayenne pepper.
  2. Thai Pumpkin Soup (Tom Kha Fak Thong): This Thai-inspired pumpkin soup combines pumpkin with coconut milk, lemongrass, ginger, and Thai spices like red curry paste. It has a rich and creamy texture with a hint of spiciness.
  3. Caribbean Pumpkin Soup: In the Caribbean, pumpkin soup is made with ingredients like pumpkin, coconut milk, Scotch bonnet peppers, and spices such as allspice and thyme. It often has a sweet and spicy flavor profile.
  4. Mexican Pumpkin Soup (Sopa de Calabaza): Mexican pumpkin soup incorporates pumpkin with ingredients like chiles, tomatoes, garlic, and spices such as cumin and coriander. It can be garnished with toppings like crumbled queso fresco and tortilla strips.
  5. Japanese Kabocha Soup: Kabocha is a Japanese variety of pumpkin, and kabocha soup is a popular dish in Japan. It combines kabocha with dashi broth, soy sauce, and sometimes miso paste. The result is a savory and umami-rich soup.
  6. French Pumpkin Soup (Potage au Potiron): In France, pumpkin soup is known as “potage au potiron.” It often features pumpkin cooked with onions, leeks, and potatoes, then pureed and finished with cream. It’s seasoned with herbs like thyme and sometimes garnished with croutons. (and a little wine on the side)
  7. Italian Pumpkin Soup (Zuppa di Zucca): Italian pumpkin soup typically includes ingredients like pumpkin, onions, garlic, and sometimes potatoes. It can be flavored with herbs like sage and rosemary and finished with a drizzle of olive oil and grated Parmesan cheese.
  8. Indian Pumpkin Soup: Indian pumpkin soup is spiced with ingredients like ginger, cumin, coriander, and turmeric. It’s often finished with a touch of yogurt or cream for creaminess.
  9. Australian Pumpkin Soup: In Australia, pumpkin soup is a popular comfort food. It’s made with pumpkin, onions, and sometimes bacon, and it’s seasoned with herbs like parsley or chives.
  10. South African Pumpkin Soup: South African pumpkin soup often includes butternut squash, and it’s flavored with spices like curry powder. It can be sweetened with a bit of sugar or honey and garnished with fresh coriander.

Carving pumpkins isn’t the only way to celebrate with this iconic gourd. Be sure to try these two recipes and add some pumpkin soup on Halloween night to warm up (I’m a heat-treating guy!) after trick-or-treating.

Classic Creamy Pumpkin Soup
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups pumpkin puree (canned or homemade)
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Fresh parsley for garnish

Instructions:

  1. In a large pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the chopped onion and garlic, sauté until translucent.
  2. Stir in the pumpkin puree, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Cook for a few minutes to blend the flavors.
  3. Pour in the broth and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Remove the pot from heat and use an immersion blender to puree the soup until smooth. Alternatively, transfer the mixture to a blender in batches.
  5. Return the soup to low heat and stir in the heavy cream. Simmer for an additional 5 minutes, ensuring it doesn’t come to a boil.
  6. Serve hot, garnished with fresh parsley. Optionally, add a dollop of sour cream or croutons for extra flavor.

Spicy Pumpkin and Coconut Soup
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups pumpkin puree
  • 1 can (13.5 oz) coconut milk
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon red curry paste
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Fresh cilantro leaves for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Heat the vegetable oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the chopped onion and garlic, sauté until softened.
  2. Stir in the red curry paste and ground cumin, and cook for an additional minute.
  3. Add the pumpkin puree and coconut milk, stirring well to combine.
  4. Pour in the broth, season with salt and pepper, and bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes.
  5. Use an immersion blender to puree the soup until smooth. If using a regular blender, allow the mixture to cool slightly before blending.
  6. Serve hot, garnished with fresh cilantro leaves.

Whether you opt for the classic creamy version or the spicy and exotic twist, pumpkin soup is a heartwarming treat that’s perfect for autumn gatherings, Thanksgiving dinners, or simply cozy evenings at home. So, whip up a pot of pumpkin soup and savor its rich flavors and health benefits today – and if you have a favorite family recipe, send it to me to try at skowalski@khtheat.com

 

 

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DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
 

 

Slurp

Lick ’em or bite ’em, popcicles are G-R-E-A-T!!!!!!!!!!!  :))))))))))))))))))

With summer upon us, I find myself sometimes falling back on some childhood traditions. Playing with the hose while watering, being fascinated by fireflies, counting endless stars, finding funny shapes in the clouds, and coveting cool deserts. Beyond ice cream, one of my “go to” favorites is popsicles. I’m a softie when the grandkids ask for one – knowing it’s going to be a big mess – but I give them the sticky sweet dessert anyway and watch as they cover their outfits with drips. Especially since we don’t have to wash them!  It got me to thinking about where these yummy delights came from, so I did some digging and found some fun info. Turns out, the popsicle was invented by an 11-year-old boy (I could use his thermal processing genius in my lab!). Enjoy, and let me know if you too had to share a popsicle with brothers and sisters (two sections broken in half with sticks). Finally, be sure to send me some of your favorite “adult” popsicle recipes – they come in handy when we’re dealing with some of  your PIA (Pain In The @%$) Jobs!  Thanks to Wikipedia, YouTube, veggiesdontbite.com, merriam-webster.com and interestingfacts.com for the info. Enjoy!

MFG video: CLICK  (love the “sticker”)
Adult popsicle recipes:  CLICK

An ice pop, or popsicle, is a liquid-based frozen snack on a stick. Unlike ice cream or sorbet, which are whipped while freezing to prevent ice crystal formation, an ice pop is “quiescently” frozen—frozen while at rest—and becomes a solid block of ice. The stick is used as a handle to hold it. (without a stick, the frozen product would be a freezie).

Frank Epperson is acclaimed to have first created an ice pop in 1905 when he accidentally left a glass of powdered lemonade soda and water with a mixing stick in it. He left the concoction on his family’s back porch overnight, and by morning, the contents had frozen solid. Epperson ran hot water over the glass and used the stirrer as a handle to free his new creation. He immediately knew he’d stumbled on something special, and called his treat an Epsicle, (a portmanteau – how’s that for a word…) of his last name and “icicle.”

Throughout his life, Epperson claimed that this experiment occurred in 1905, when he was 11 years old. While most publications agree, the San Francisco Chronicle’s website counters that local temperatures never reached freezing in 1905; they did, however, in nearby Oakland, where the Epperson family moved around 1907, meaning the fateful event may have happened a few years later.

In 1922, Epperson, then a realtor with Realty Syndicate Company in Oakland, introduced the “Popsicle” at a fireman’s ball. The product got traction quickly, and in 1923 at the age of 29, Epperson received a patent for his “Epsicle” ice pop, and by 1924, had patented all handled, frozen confections or ice lollipops. He officially debuted the Epsicle in seven fruit flavors at Neptune Beach amusement park, marketed as a “frozen lollipop,” or a “drink on a stick.”

Although he briefly set up a royalty arrangement with the Popsicle Corporation, by 1925 he sold his patent rights to the Joe Lowe Company, which became the exclusive sales agent for the Popsicle Corporation. Over the decades, Epperson’s naming oversight cost him considerable profits – as of 2020, the global ice pop market was valued at $4.7 billion (ooops on that decision). A significant share of that revenue comes from Popsicles, a summer staple now sold in more than 30 flavors.

The ”twin pop” was invented during the depression, so two kids could enjoy a popsicle for just 5 cents. (broken in half made them easy to share, as each had a stick).

Estimated number of Popsicles purchased globally each year is around 2 billion.

The largest ice pop ever created weighed 20,020 lbs. was made by Jan van den Berg at Iglo-Ola Produktie B.V., Hellendoorn, Netherlands in 1997. In 2005, NYC tried to break the record…but it melted.

The world’s biggest Popsicle stick sculpture

The tallest ice lolly (popsicle) stick structure is 8.23 m (27 ft), and was achieved by Justin O’Brien, Andrew Hill, Paiden Carlisle, Jasmine Defore, Carol Blankenship, Miguel Ramos, Joshua Sauls, Raymond Cantrell and AJ Cantrell (all USA), in Dayton, Ohio, USA, on January 13, 2023. The team used 2,738 ice lolly sticks and 46 hot glue sticks to make their structure, which was built in two portions and then assembled and secured with additional lolly sticks and hot glue.

The United States celebrates National Cherry Popsicle Day on August 26th each year.

Popsicles have even made their way to space! NASA astronauts have been known to enjoy the frozen treats as a refreshing snack while on missions. (wonder if they keep them cold outside?)

An alternative to the store-bought ice pops is making them at home using fruit juice or any freezable beverage. A classic method involves using ice cube trays and toothpicks, although various ice pop freezer molds are also available. I have found some amazing ingredients to put in my homemade popsicles!  Don’t forget to send your favorites over to me!

In 2018, the UK food-focused design firm called Bompas & Parr announced that they had created the world’s first ‘non-melting’ ice pop. The ice pop does melt but not as fast as other ice pops. This is due to the strands of fruit fibers inside the ice pops which makes them thicker than regular ice pops. The thicker the ice pop the slower it melts. This design was inspired by the material called pykrete, which was invented by Geoffrey Pyke (another portmanteau!)

Top flavors: Cherry, Firecracker, Grape, Lime, Creamsicle, Root Beer

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Oh So Good

Sweet Corn time, oh, yeah!!!  :)))))

It’s that time of year when our local crops are starting to come in – a time to enjoy the effort put in by farmers, growers and back yard champions.  Ridiculously delicious tomatoes, tasty cucumbers and zucchini, beets and potatoes, peppers of all kinds, and of course fresh corn on the cob. I know that I’ve written about corn on the cob before, there’s just something about fresh corn that can’t be beat. I’m a sucker for those roadside “Sweet Corn” signs, darting in to “just get some corn”, and coming out with two or three bags of produce. Corn is sooooo good, and when prepared in different ways, I just can’t get enough. I really don’t think a person should every eat just one ear of corn!  Aside from just boiling in water, I searched out a little history, a bunch of fun ways to cook it, and also different seasonings and toppings – and I think everyone is a hit. I think that  you to give  each of them all a try.  Special thanks to Wikipedia, ChatGPT, foodnetwork.com, spicysouthernkitchen.com, simplyrecipes.com, southernliving.com, foodwithfeeling.com, hungryhealthyhappy.com, pumpkinnspice.com, thespruceeats.com, thekitchn.com, spendwithpennies.com, and natashaskitchen.com. And if you have a family favorite, be sure to send it my way at skowalski@khtheat.com. Enjoy, and thanks to all the recipe providers.

The history of sweet corn dates back thousands of years. Sweet corn (Zea mays var. saccharata) is a cultivar of maize, which originated in Mesoamerica, in what is now modern-day Mexico. Corn was first domesticated by ancient indigenous civilizations such as the Maya and Aztec around 9,000 years ago. These early maize varieties were quite different from the sweet corn we consume today; they were small, had hard kernels, and were primarily used for making flour or eaten as a starchy vegetable.

The genetic mutation responsible for the sweetness in corn is believed to have occurred around 10,000 years ago in the valleys of the Tehuacán region of southern Mexico. This natural mutation caused an accumulation of sugar in the kernels, making them tastier than the traditional maize varieties.

The arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas in 1492 marked the beginning of the Columbian Exchange, a period during which various crops, including corn, were introduced to the rest of the world. Corn was brought back to Europe and other parts of the world, where it was initially grown primarily for animal feed.

The first sweet corn variety, known as “Papoon,” was developed in the 18th century in Pennsylvania. It had a genetic mutation that made it sweeter and more palatable than other corn varieties.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, sweet corn’s popularity increased rapidly, particularly in the US. The development of new sweet corn varieties, such as the “Golden Bantam,” in the early 20th century further enhanced its taste and texture. Canning and freezing technologies also contributed to the widespread availability of sweet corn throughout the year.

Here are some of the best ways to cook this tasty treat:

Grilled corn: Brush the corn with melted butter or olive oil, sprinkle some salt and pepper, and then grill it over medium heat until it’s lightly charred. The grilling process enhances the natural sweetness of the corn and adds a smoky flavor. Try this one: CLICK

Boiled corn: Boiling corn is a classic and straightforward method. Simply place the corn cobs in a pot of boiling water for about 5-7 minutes until they become tender. Serve with butter and salt for a simple yet delicious treat. Here’s one with butter and milk, instead of just water: CLICK

Microwave corn: Just leave it in the husk for hot steamy delight: CLICK

Roasted corn: Little wrap of foil, butter and salt, fresh spices and YUM!  CLICK

And, to top off your corn, try these toppings:

Butter and salt: Sometimes, the simplest way is the best. Spread a generous amount of butter on the cooked corn, and then sprinkle it with salt to enhance the natural sweetness. Pepper too, (it looks cool!)

Mexican-style street corn (Elote): Coat the boiled or grilled corn with a mixture of mayonnaise, lime juice, chili powder, and crumbled cotija cheese. You can also sprinkle some fresh cilantro for added flavor. CLICK

Herb butter: Create a flavored butter by mixing softened butter with chopped fresh herbs like parsley, cilantro, or chives. Spread the herb butter over the warm corn for a burst of savory goodness. CLICK

Parmesan cheese and herbs: After applying butter to the cooked corn, sprinkle grated Parmesan cheese and finely chopped herbs like thyme or basil on top. CLICK

Cajun-style corn: For a spicy kick, mix together melted butter, Cajun seasoning, and a dash of hot sauce. Brush this mixture over the corn for a zesty and flavorful experience. CLICK

Lime and chili: Squeeze fresh lime juice over the corn and then sprinkle it with chili powder or Tajin seasoning for a tangy and spicy twist.  CLICK

One Topping Winners: – cheezy, spicy, tangy, or hot, hot , hot – here’s are some One Topping ideas you need to try: CLICK

In the odd chance you have leftovers, here’s some simple tips to make the most of them:

Corn on the cob salad: If you have leftover corn, cut the kernels off the cob and use them in a salad with cherry tomatoes, avocado, red onion, and cilantro, dressed with lime juice and olive oil. Here’s another one: CLICK

Corn chowder: If you have several cobs leftover or you just want to try something different, you can make a delicious corn chowder. Cut the corn off the cob and use it as an ingredient in a creamy soup with potatoes, onions, and other veggies. CLICK

Remember, corn on the cob is best enjoyed when it’s fresh and in season, as the sweetness and juiciness are at their peak.  Enjoy!!

 

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Bzzzzzzzzz

Don’t forget your Cicada gear!!

It’s that time of year.  Hot muggy days. Spot showers and thunderstorms.  Counting the days left before school begins. And a “buzz” in the air.  Yep –those PIA cicadas. Like you, I’m fascinated by the noise, habits, and rituals of these not so pretty insects. I think it’s cool how one starts to buzz, and others jump in, joining one another in chorus, (something not surprisingly called “chorusing”. Cicadas are fascinating insects that have a rich history and interesting trivia associated with them, dating back thousands of years. I jumped on the web and dug out some cool info I think you’ll enjoy.  And although some folks may find them appetizing, I’m not one to try them! Special thanks to Wikipedia, cornell.edu, youtube.com, Smithsonian, and cbsnews.com for the info. Enjoy the buzzzzz!

Cool Videos:

 

  • A cicada is an insect belonging to the order Hemiptera.. They are well-known for their distinctive songs, particularly the loud buzzing or whirring sounds produced by the males. Cicadas have a unique life cycle and are categorized into two main groups: annual cicadas (think every summer) and periodical cicadas 13-17 years in “broods”.

  • Cicadas are relatively large insects, typically ranging from about 1 to 2 inches (2.5 to 5 centimeters) in length, depending on the species. They have two pairs of membranous wings that are transparent or slightly opaque. The front wings are larger than the hind wings and are held roof-like over the abdomen when at rest.
  • Male cicadas produce loud calls by using specialized structures called tymbals, which are located on their abdomen. They generate these sounds as part of their mating behavior.
  • In Greek mythology, cicadas were linked to the Muses – nine goddesses. It was believed that the music and songs of the cicadas were a form of divine inspiration that connected them to the arts and creativity.
  • The periodical cicadas, also known as “Brood X,” are one of the most well-known cicada groups in the United States. They emerge every 13-17 years in massive numbers.
  • In some cultures, cicadas have religious connotations. In ancient Greece, they were associated with Apollo, the god of music, poetry, and the sun. In Japan, cicadas are considered symbols of summer and are associated with Hachiman, the god of war and agriculture.

  • The noise produced by cicadas is a fascinating aspect of their biology and behavior. The sounds they make are primarily produced by male cicadas as a means of communication and attracting mates. Cicada noises have evolved over millions of years as an essential part of their reproductive behavior and survival strategies.
  • Here’s the science behind cicada noises: Cicadas have specialized structures called tymbals, which are drum-like membranes located on either side of their abdomen. These tymbals consist of a series of ribs that can rapidly contract and relax, producing a clicking or snapping sound. The cicada’s tymbal muscles contract, causing the tymbals to buckle inward. When the muscles relax, the tymbals snap back to their original position. This action creates a distinct sound.
  • The abdomen of male cicadas is typically hollow, acting as a resonance chamber that amplifies the sound produced by the tymbals. The sound is further amplified as it resonates through the insect’s exoskeleton.
  • In some species, male cicadas synchronize their calls to create a chorus effect.This behavior is known as “chorusing” and serves to increase the overall volume and attract more females.
  • Interestingly, cicadas also use their calls for thermoregulation. The heat generated during the rapid muscle contractions helps warm the insect’s body, making it more active in cooler conditions.
  • Brood X, also known as the Great Eastern Brood, is one of the most remarkable groups of periodical cicadas in the United States. emerging en masse at regular intervals, typically every 13 or 17 years. Brood X is particularly notable for its large numbers and widespread distribution, found in the eastern United States, covering states such as Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C. When the temperature warms in the spring, cicadas rise up from the dirt. The raucous four to six week-long event rages until all the participants die and litter the forest floor.

  • Once emerged, the male cicadas begin their loud, distinctive calling songs to attract females. After mating, the females lay their eggs in small branches of trees. Once hatched, the nymphs fall to the ground, where they burrow into the soil and begin their 17-year underground development.
  • A full-scale cicadas can reach a deafening crescendo as millions of males all call for mates at the same time. The amorous din can reach roughly 100 decibels, which is just shy of standing three feet from a chainsaw.
  • Scientists from the Navy’s Undersea Warfare Center have studied cicadas in hopes of figuring out how male cicadas manage to produce their incredibly noisy mating calls without expending much effort. The idea is that a device that mimicked a cicada’s method of sound production could be used for remote sensing underwater or ship-to-ship communications.
  • In the summertime, two-inch-long wasps called cicada killers are as single-minded as their name suggests. After mating, females take to the skies to do nothing but hunt bumbling cicadas. When a female cicada killer grapples with her quarry in mid-air, she uses a honking, needle-sharp stinger to pierce the cicada’s hard exoskeleton and inject a venom that paralyzes the victim. After dragging her immobilized prey into a special chamber she’s hollowed out along her burrow, the female wasp lays a single egg on the cicada and seals the chamber’s entrance. In two or three days, the larval wasp will hatch and begin eating the paralyzed cicada alive over the course of a week or two. Nature’s incredible cycle at its best.
  • Cicada Cookie recipe!

Yummmmm!!!!!! :))))))

 

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.

As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Froffles

Waffles for breakfast, lunch and dinner, oh, yeah!!!!  :))))  And you’ve got to get that great waffle shirt above (google: waffle t-shirt) If you do get it, PLEASE send me a pic with you wearing it. Thanks!

With my engrained morning routine of waking up and getting to the office early to work on your PIA (Pain in the @%$) Jobs! – (I get so much done before most of you have hit the snooze button), I sometimes forget to eat a hearty breakfast.  But when I make time, one of my favorites is to add a few waffles to the plate.  They are so simple and convenient – right from the freezer, pop ‘em into the toaster, a lot of butter in those little squares then lightly covered with powdered sugar and I’m good to go. Now when it comes to my girls and grandkids, all bets are off! – syrup, ice cream, whipped cream, cherry pie filling, fried chicken, et!  Like I often do when thinking about simple products, I get intrigued by the history and production of these little jems – ingredients, cooking (we call it heat treating around here – or more specifically thermal processing, as they are heated up, then frozen for freshness), packaging, boxing, shipping and consumption.  I took to the “net” to learn more and just had to share. Waffles date back to the Greeks and Romans (who knew they had toasters then??). Enjoy, and be sure to send me your favorite toppings and traditions (skowalski@khtheat.com) Thanks to businessinsider.com, schiffcastironcollection.com, myrecipes.com, thesaltymarsmellow.com, and Wikipedia for the info and YouTube for the video.

Start with a fun video (love the little needles)

  • Waffle-like cakes have been cooked since ancient times. The ancient Greeks cooked flat cakes called “obelios” between two metal plates. The Romans had a similar cake called “ocus.”
  • The modern concept of the waffle, with its distinctive grid pattern, originated in the 13th century when metal cooking plates with honeycomb patterns were developed in France.
  • Waffles gained popularity in America during the 18th and 19th centuries. Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, is said to have brought the first waffle iron to America from France.
  • Waffles have variations across different cultures. In Scandinavia, there are thin and crisp waffles often served with whipped cream and berries. In the Netherlands, the Dutch enjoy a type of waffle called “stroopwafels,” which consists of two thin waffles with caramel syrup in the middle.
  • Working in their parents’ basement in San Jose, California, in the early 1930s, Frank, Anthony, and Sam Dorsa first whipped up their own brand of mayonnaise. Since the base ingredient of mayonnaise is egg yolks — and the brothers took pride in using “100% fresh ranch eggs” — they christened their fledgling company “Eggo.” Despite launching the business during the Great Depression, Eggo mayonnaise sold like hotcakes, motivating the Dorsas to extend their product line. Soon, they were selling waffle batter — another egg-based product.
  • When the frozen food industry took off in the 1950s, the brothers wanted to take advantage of  the rush to the freezer aisle. Frank Dorsa (a trained machinist) repurposed a carousel engine into a rotating device that could anchor a series of waffle irons, each cooking a breakfast treat that was flipped by a factory employee. The machine allowed Eggo to prepare thousands of freezer-bound waffles per hour. These debuted in grocery stores in 1953 under the name Froffles, a portmanteau of “frozen” and “waffles.” Customers referred to them simply as “Eggos,” and the Froffles moniker was dropped within two years. Over the years, billions have been sold.
  • National Waffle Day: In the United States, August 24th is celebrated as National Waffle Day. This date commemorates the first U.S. patent for a waffle iron issued to Cornelius Swarthout of Troy, New York, in 1869.  Learn more
  • The Waffle House chain, founded in 1955, is an iconic institution in the southern United States. Known for its round-shaped waffles and 24/7 service, it has become a cultural phenomenon and a popular gathering spot. Some say, since they are open 24 hours a day, there are no locks on the doors.
  • Waffles can be enjoyed with a variety of toppings. Common choices include butter, syrup (maple syrup being the classic), powdered sugar, fresh fruits, whipped cream, chocolate spread, or even savory toppings like fried chicken in the case of the popular dish chicken and waffles. For exotic toppings, click
  • Waffle iron collecting is a niche hobby for some enthusiasts. Vintage waffle irons, with their unique designs and craftsmanship, are sought after by collectors who appreciate their historical and aesthetic value. See more here (I like the rabbits)
  • Waffles have evolved and become a beloved breakfast and dessert item worldwide. They continue to be enjoyed in various forms and flavors, delighting people of all ages.
  • Century in which waffle-eating parties called “wafel-frolics” became popular in the U.S. 18th.  What fun – learn more
  • The world’s largest waffle, created in the Netherlands in 2013 was 110 lbs.
  • Yummy homemade waffle mix recipe

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

DO YOU LIKE CONTESTS?
Me, too.
As you may know the Kowalski Heat Treating logo finds its way
into the visuals of my Friday posts.
I.  Love.  My.  Logo.
One week there could be three logos.
The next week there could be 15 logos.
And sometimes the logo is very small or just a partial logo showing.
But there are always logos in some of the pictures.
So, I challenge you, my beloved readers, to count them and send me a
quick email with the total number of logos in the Friday post.
On the following Tuesday I’ll pick a winner from the correct answers
and send that lucky person some great KHT swag.
So, start counting and good luck!  
Oh, and the logos at the very top header don’t count.
Got it? Good.  :-))))  
Have fun!!

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::